LRO lunar mission successfully enters moon orbit

Jun 23, 2009
This is an artist's concept of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter with an image of Earth in the background. Credit: NASA

After a four and a half day journey from the Earth, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, has successfully entered orbit around the moon. Engineers at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., confirmed the spacecraft's lunar orbit insertion at 6:27 a.m. EDT Tuesday.

During transit to the moon, engineers performed a mid-course correction to get the spacecraft in the proper position to reach its lunar destination. Since the moon is always moving, the spacecraft shot for a target point ahead of the moon. When close to the moon, LRO used its motor to slow down until the gravity of the moon caught the spacecraft in lunar .

"Lunar orbit insertion is a crucial milestone for the mission," said Cathy Peddie, LRO deputy project manager at Goddard. "The LRO mission cannot begin until the moon captures us. Once we enter the moon's orbit, we can begin to buildup the dataset needed to understand in greater detail the lunar topography, features and resources. We are so proud to be a part of this exciting mission and NASA's planned return to the moon."

A series of four engine burns over the next four days will put the satellite into its commissioning phase orbit. During the commissioning phase each of its seven instruments is checked out and brought online. The commissioning phase will end approximately 60 days after launch, when LRO will use its engines to transition to its primary mission orbit.

For its primary mission, LRO will orbit above the moon at about 31 miles, or 50 kilometers, for one year. The spacecraft's instruments will help scientists compile high resolution, three-dimensional maps of the lunar surface and also survey it at many spectral wavelengths.

The satellite will explore the moon's deepest craters, examining permanently sunlit and shadowed regions, and provide understanding of the effects of lunar radiation on humans. LRO will return more data about the than any previous mission.

Source: JPL/NASA (news : web)

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docknowledge
1 / 5 (1) Jun 23, 2009
Why is it I get more good news reading PhysOrg than almost any other site? Does this mean our society should fund science more heavily? Nah. Let's see more articles on articles on science fraud and corruption. Get real, PhysOrg. I don't mind if you throw in a few articles such as this which are purely uplifting, and give us a little hope in our day.
TrustTheONE
not rated yet Jun 24, 2009
finally we will find the aliens lunar bases!
Bahhh!
albert
1 / 5 (1) Jun 24, 2009
Moon? I wasn't aware any human went to the moon? Wasn't that the emerging Hollywood back then?
DeeWizard
not rated yet Aug 27, 2009
We went to the moon, but the video was made in Hollywood. NASA didn't think we were ready to meet there little grey friends. :)