Intel program spotlights dubious online claims

Jun 19, 2009
Intel has launched software that sniffs out questionable claims at websites.

Intel has launched software that sniffs out questionable claims at websites.

A "Dispute Finder" crafted by Intel researchers in Berkeley, California, for Firefox web browsers alerts Internet surfers to contentions that are contradicted by elsewhere online.

"The reason this is important is that very often you'll read a website and not realize this is only one side of the story," research scientist Robert Ennals said in an online video.

Dispute Finder automatically highlights text containing contested claims and then links to boxes summarizing points and counter-points. The data base is designed to grow and evolve with user input.

Votes regarding the reliability of information are used to filter dubious data.

Researchers reportedly envision a version of the software that will scan caption information in television programs for specious claims and a mobile device capable of "listening" for questionable comments in conversations.

The mini-program, which works with Firefox web browsers, became available Thursday online at disputefinder.cs.berkeley.edu.

(c) 2009 AFP

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5 / 5 (1) Jul 02, 2009
It could be a shot in the foot, as users would become more discouraged to use the internet as a resource. The source of the problem is there is nothing like peer review for internet submissions like blogs. So there are many different voices due to internet freedom, but now let's suppress some of them by filtering out the ones which are voted down? Can you imagine the implications for physorg.com? Why not just let it stand nothing on the internet is set in stone, you have to find out yourself through your own work?