US Navy culture leads to heavy drinking

Jun 09, 2009

The nature of the U.S. Navy workplace leads to higher heavy drinking for sailors than for civilians, according to an article in the May issue of the Journal of Mixed Methods Research published by SAGE.

Several issues specific to the Navy contribute to problem , according to the study, including the youth of recruits, alternating periods of exertion and boredom, and a culture that emphasizes drinking as a mechanism for bonding, recreation, and stress relief. These conclusions were reached using methods that included a statistical analysis of survey data as well as an analyses of interviews and observations on bases, ships and submarines.

In addition to presenting the results of the study, the authors also use it to make observations about the use of mixed methods in conducting this type of research.

Methodologically, the study design drew from approaches associated with , , and anthropology, reflecting the disciplines of research team members.

"A second purpose of the article is methodological in scope," the authors write. We sought "to use the study findings as a springboard for discussing the challenges and opportunities in carrying out collaborative mixed method research among this population."

Mixed methods is a fairly new research method where the investigator collects data and draws inferences using both qualitative and quantitative approaches.

Source: SAGE Publications

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Mauricio
2 / 5 (2) Jun 09, 2009
Important to notice that alcohol consumption reduces brain mass.

So... do we have some people with rapidly- decreasing-brain driving nuclear submarines loaded with nuclear weapons? yes, we do
aufever
1 / 5 (1) Jun 10, 2009
Mauricio, you are totally clueless. The Nuc Subs are out for usually 120 days with Zero Alcohol on board. Get a real life and taalk about something you know about like your lack of a penis.
docknowledge
3 / 5 (1) Jun 10, 2009
Uh, um, guys.

Mauricio, reducing brain mass is probably not critical for the 20-somethings who have just started to drink. In any event, no one on those subs would be making a decision to fire a nuclear missile.

aufever, they may have no alcohol, but they surely have other illegal drugs, don't they now?

Drinking has long been a part of Western naval tradition. Daily rum rations were a regular thing. I'm not sure what point this article is making.
chuckster
4 / 5 (1) Jun 10, 2009
Actually there are no drugs on a sub underway. If a sailor or officer chooses to use drugs while in port that is certainly possible. However, unannounced monthly random drug tests really limit the amount of drug abuse in the submarine community. I can't speak for the surface community since I never served on board a surface warship. Drug abuse and alcohol abuse among the submarine officer corps is virtually nonexistent.