Men who work with their female partners more likely to adhere to CPAP therapy

Jun 08, 2009

Men who work with their female partners while receiving continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are more likely to adhere to their treatment, according to a research abstract that will be presented at SLEEP 2009, the 23rd Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies.

Results indicate that patients who work with their partners have the highest level of adherence for CPAP therapy. Encouragement, the use of negative tactics (such as evoking fear or blame) and reminding did not produce an increase in treatment adherence.

The study obtained demographic and relationship quality information from 23 married/cohabitating male OSA patients before CPAP initiation, and included adherence data from 14 men. Partner involvement with CPAP was assessed at day 10 and three months post CPAP initiation using 25-item measure of tactics to encourage healthful behavior. Tactics used included positive (encouraging) negative (blaming) bilateral (working together) and unilateral (reminding).

According to the principal investigator, Kelly Glazer Baron, PhD, postdoctoral fellow at Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., the study showed that patients who believed that their relationships were more supportive were more likely to work together with their partner while using CPAP.

"We know that in many health conditions, having a supportive partner can improve adherence and emotional well being when dealing with a ," said Baron. "This is the first study in CPAP treatment to show that working together with the partner in an active and supportive manner was associated with better adherence."

CPAP is the most common and effective treatment for OSA. By working to normalize breathing, CPAP helps protect patients from the severe that are related to OSA, which include heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and stroke.

Source: American Academy of Medicine (news : web)

Explore further: Dermatologists present seven referral tips for rheumatologists

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Procedure helps to eliminate sleep apnea

Oct 24, 2007

A procedure known as uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP) may help some patients improve or even eliminate their obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to a new study. The research, presented at CHEST 2007, the 73rd annual ...

Treating sleep apnea in Alzheimer's patients helps cognition

Dec 03, 2008

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment seems to improve cognitive functioning in patients with Alzheimer's disease who also suffer from obstructive sleep apnea, according to the results of a randomized clinical ...

Recommended for you

Sickle cell trait tied to increased pulmonary embolism risk

3 hours ago

(HealthDay)—For African-Americans, sickle cell trait is associated with an increased risk of pulmonary embolism, but not deep vein thrombosis, according to a study published online Nov. 13 in the Journal of Thrombosis an ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dirk_bruere
not rated yet Jun 08, 2009
LOL! Read it as "Crap therapy"

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.