Advance in bowel cancer test research

Jun 04, 2009
The human digestive system. Photo by: CSIRO

(PhysOrg.com) -- Australian researchers have developed gene expression biomarkers which can accurately discriminate pre-cancerous and cancerous colorectal growths from non-cancerous controls.

Being presented today at the Digestive Disease Week conference in Chicago, the preliminary findings are the result of a collaborative study - involving CSIRO, Flinders University and Australian healthcare company, Clinical Genomics Pty Ltd - designed to develop an improved /diagnostic test for detecting and significant pre-cancer lesions.

”If we can now show that the levels of these in blood or stool also correlate strongly with disease state in a large group of patients with cancer or pre-cancer lesions (ie adenomatous polyps) we may have the basis for a very important new diagnostic weapon in the fight against bowel cancer,” says CSIRO’s Preventative Health National Research Flagship Theme Leader in Colorectal Cancer and Gut Health, Dr Trevor Lockett.

According to Professor Graeme Young from Flinders University’s Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, regular screening for bowel cancer in people aged 50 years and over is a powerful tool for reducing the impact of the disease in Australia.

“If we can develop a screening test that can point to the presence of clinically important pre-cancerous adenomas which are then removed during follow-up , we will actually be able to prevent the occurrence of bowel cancer in some cases,” Professor Young says.

The CEO of Clinical Genomics Pty Ltd, Lawrence La Pointe, says if a more robust screening test for bowel cancer and especially pre-cancer emerges, the research team will have achieved a major advance likely to further improve screening outcomes and more precisely identify those people most likely to benefit from colonoscopic investigation.

Provided by CSIRO (news : web)

Explore further: Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

3 hours ago

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Unraveling the 'black ribbon' around lung cancer

Apr 17, 2014

It's not uncommon these days to find a colored ribbon representing a disease. A pink ribbon is well known to signify breast cancer. But what color ribbon does one think of with lung cancer?

User comments : 0

More news stories

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Easter morning delivery for space station

Space station astronauts got a special Easter treat: a cargo ship full of supplies. The shipment arrived Sunday morning via the SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule.