Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet helps summer travelers beat jet lag

Jun 02, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- As the summer travel season begins, many vacation and business travelers will beat jet lag with the Anti-Jet-Lag Diet developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory.

A study published in 2002 in the medical journal Military Medicine found that travelers who use the Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag are seven times less likely to experience jet lag when traveling west and 16 times less likely when traveling east. A copy of the study is online at AntiJetLagDiet.com.

"Anyone traveling across three or more time zones can use the Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet to eliminate or reduce jet lag," said Argonne 's Dave Baurac. "The Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet maintains our healthy cellular rhythms by using the same natural time cues that nature uses, such as meal contents and timing, light and dark cycles and daily activity cycles."

Jet lag symptoms include feelings of irritability, insomnia, indigestion and general disorientation that occur when the body's inner clock is out of step with environmental time cues like meal times, sunrise and sunset, and daily cycles of rest and activity.

Invented by Charles Ehret, an Argonne biologist whose career was devoted to the study of daily biological rhythms in a variety of organisms from paramecia to mammals, the Anti-Jet-Lag Diet has helped hundreds of thousands of travelers avoid .

Since 1982, Argonne has provided information about the Anti-Jet-Lag Diet to President Ronald Reagan, the U.S. Army and Navy, the U.S. Secret Service, the Central Intelligence Agency, the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the World Bank, the Federal Reserve System, the Canadian National Swim Team, and dozens of corporations, scout groups, church groups, travel groups and individual travelers.

For a small fee, visitors to the AntiJetLagDiet.com Web site can also use Argonne-developed software to calculate a detailed Anti-Jet-Lag Diet plan tailored to their specific itinerary.

Provided by Argonne National Laboratory (news : web)

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