Long-distance brain waves focus attention (w/Video)

May 28, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Just as our world buzzes with distractions -- from phone calls to e-mails to tweets -- the neurons in our brain are bombarded with messages. Research has shown that when we pay attention, some of these neurons begin firing in unison, like a chorus rising above the noise. Now, a study in the May 29 issue of Science reveals the likely brain center that serves as the conductor of this neural chorus.

MIT found that neurons in the prefrontal cortex — the brain's planning center — fire in unison and send signals to the to do the same, generating high-frequency waves that oscillate between these distant like a vibrating spring. These waves, also known as gamma oscillations, have long been associated with cognitive states like attention, learning, and consciousness.

"We are especially interested in gamma oscillations in the prefrontal cortex because it provides top-down influences over other parts of the brain," explains senior author Robert Desimone, director of the McGovern Institute for Brain Research and the Doris and Don Berkey Professor of Neuroscience at MIT. "We know that the prefrontal cortex is affected in people with schizophrenia, ADHD and many other , and that gamma oscillations are also altered in these conditions. Our results suggest that altered neural synchrony in the prefrontal cortex could disrupt communication between this region and other areas of the brain, leading to altered perceptions, thoughts, and emotions."

To explain neural synchrony, Desimone uses the analogy of a crowded party with people talking in different rooms. If individuals raise their voices at random, the noise just becomes louder. But if a group of individuals in one room chant together in unison, the next room is more likely to hear the message. And if people in the next room chant in response, the two rooms can communicate.

In the Science study, Desimone looked for patterns of neural synchrony in two "rooms" of the brain associated with attention — the frontal eye field (FEF) within the prefrontal cortex and the V4 region of the visual cortex. Lead authors Georgia Gregoriou, a postdoctoral associate in the Desimone lab, and Stephen Gotts of the National Institute of Mental Health, trained two macaque monkeys to watch a monitor displaying multiple objects, and to concentrate on one of the objects when cued. They monitored neural activity from the FEF and the V4 regions of the brain when the monkeys were either paying attention to the object or ignoring it.

When the monkeys first paid attention to the appropriate object, neurons in both areas showed strong increases in activity. Then, as if connected by a spring, the oscillations in each area began to synchronize with one another. Desimone's team analyzed the timing of the neural activity and found that the prefrontal cortex became engaged by attention first, followed by the visual cortex — as if the prefrontal cortex commanded the visual region to snap to attention. The delay between neural activity in these areas during each wave cycle reflected the speed at which signals travel from one region to the other — indicating that the two brain regions were talking to one another.

Desimone suspects this pattern of oscillation is not just specific to attention, but could also represent a more general mechanism for communication between different parts of the brain. These findings support speculation that gamma synchrony enables far-flung regions of the brain to rapidly communicate with each other — which has important implications for understanding and treating disorders ranging from schizophrenia to impaired vision and . "This helps us think about how to approach studying and treating these disorders by finding ways to restore gamma rhythms in the affected brain regions."

Source: McGovern Institute for Brain< Research

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zevkirsh
not rated yet May 29, 2009
there is certainly empirical evidence for the notion that attention has its own dedicated brain portion. however. meditation exercises block out stimulation in order to focus on observing the conscious phenomena of attention/consciousness.

this aside, it would seem that lower animals, such as reptiles , that lack much of a prefrontal cortex also have attention spans. this is particularly obvious when you watch them hunt something. it would be interesting to investigate the mechanisms of attention in these animals as well.

as usual, the brain is mysterious. and it would be most probable that the story and explanation for 'attention' is more complicated than saying a single area accounts for 'it'. there may be various levels of attention in the brain pertaining to various levels of conscious and subconscious activity. and yet, the 'attention' we speak of which is the one we can observe most readily upon closing our eyes and engaging relaxation exercises, probably would have its roots in one , or at least fewer, areas than the various types of 'attention' that are probably all running simultaneously through our circuitry