Youth diabetes in Europe set to explode: study

May 28, 2009

Incidence of Type 1 diabetes in children aged under five in Europe is set to double by 2020 over 2005 levels while cases among the under-15s will rise by 70 percent, according to a study published on Thursday.

The trend, based on diagnosed cases between 1989-2003, will be highest in the former Communist countries of eastern Europe, it warns.

The paper, published online by the British journal The Lancet, says the increase is so dramatic that it cannot be attributed to genes alone.

Instead, "modern lifestyle habits" are the likely culprits, it says.

, a potentially lethal condition, affects 246 million people worldwide and is expected to affect some 380 million by 2025, according to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) website.

generally occurs in childhood and early adolescence.

The immune system destroys cells in the pancreas that make insulin, the hormone that breaks down glucose into other forms of energy, and this causes sugar levels in the blood to rise dangerously.

Experts say the disorder seems to be caused by a mix of genetic vulnerability and environmental factors.

These include increases in weight and height, less exposure to early infections in childhood and delivery by .

, which affects far more people than Type 1, occurs when there is insufficient insulin or cells become insensitive to the that is produced.

It is closely associated with chronic obesity, which has become an epidemic in the industrialised world as a result of sedentary lifestyles and the switch to sugary and fatty foods.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Researchers discover target for treating dengue fever

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Caesarean babies more likely to develop diabetes

Aug 26, 2008

Babies delivered by Caesarean section have a 20 per cent higher risk than normal deliveries of developing the most common type of diabetes in childhood, according to a study led by Queen's University Belfast.

Dramatic increase of Type 1 diabetes in under fives

Mar 16, 2007

Researchers are calling for more work in to the reasons behind a big increase of young children with Type 1 diabetes. A new study, led by Bristol University, has discovered that the number of children under five-years-old ...

Recommended for you

Researchers discover target for treating dengue fever

8 hours ago

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other ...

Tracking flu levels with Wikipedia

9 hours ago

Can monitoring Wikipedia hits show how many people have the flu? Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital, USA, have developed a method of estimating levels of influenza-like illness in the American population by analysing ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Chronic inflammation linked to 'high-grade' prostate cancer

Men who show signs of chronic inflammation in non-cancerous prostate tissue may have nearly twice the risk of actually having prostate cancer than those with no inflammation, according to results of a new study led by researchers ...

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...