Intel, Microsoft, Dell band together for WiGig

May 06, 2009 By PETER SVENSSON , AP Technology Writer

(AP) -- Wi-Fi, WiMax, WirelessHD, WHDI and now ... WiGig?

Computer and home entertainment industry leaders, including Corp., Corp., Inc. and Panasonic Corp., said Wednesday that they're forming a new association to create an even faster wireless technology for zipping large files around the home.

WiGig will be more than 10 times faster than Wi-Fi, and should be able to deliver high-definition video from computers and set-top boxes to TV sets without the need for unsightly wires, the companies said.

The range will be shorter than Wi-Fi - WiGig will work well within a room, and perhaps extend to an adjacent room as well.

There are already several technologies competing for the job of in-home wireless video transmission. WirelessHD, championed by SiBEAM Inc. of Sunnyvale, Calif., is designed specifically to link set-top boxes and Blu-ray players to TV sets. WHDI, invented by Amimon Corp. of Israel, uses Wi-Fi-like technology to do the same thing.

Ali Sadri, chairman of the newly formed Wireless Gigabit Alliance and an Intel executive, said WiGig was not a direct competitor to technologies like WirelessHD, but has broader goals. It aims to link not just TVs, but cell phones, video cameras and PCs as well.

Both WiGig and WirelessHD will use the 60 gigahertz frequency band, a largely unused space in the airwaves that allows for extremely high transfer speeds at short ranges. Sadri said WiGig will be capable of transfers at 6 gigabits per second, roughly fast enough to transmit the contents of a DVD in 15 seconds.

The WiGig Alliance aims to complete a "specification," or basic blueprint for compatible devices, late this year. Products could follow next year.

©2009 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Explore further: Verizon launches rewards program with tracking

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Faster Bluetooth chips coming early next year

Apr 22, 2009

(AP) -- The next version of the Bluetooth wireless technology is expected to transfer data 10 times faster than the current incarnation. Gadgets using it could be on the market by early next year.

Bluetooth 3.0 Launches April 21

Apr 10, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- The short-range wireless standard Bluetooth 3.0 will officially launch on April 21. The Bluetooth 3.0 standard is expected to deliver faster short-range wireless speeds up to 480 Mb per second.

World's First Built-In Wi-Fi -Enabled Digital Cameras

Sep 02, 2005

Nikon is redefining the digital camera shooting experience with the announcement of two new revolutionary Wi-Fi enabled models. The Coolpix P1 and P2 are the world's first built-in Wi-Fi-enabled (IEEE802.11b/g) ...

Fundamental Shift in Embedded Wi-Fi Market

Aug 24, 2004

A wireless LAN is one in which a mobile user can connect to a local area network (LAN) through a wireless (radio) connection. One of the hottest technology markets, Wireless LAN (WLAN), or Wi-Fi, is undergoing a fundamental shift, according to In-Stat/MDR ...

Recommended for you

Verizon launches rewards program with tracking

Jul 21, 2014

Verizon Wireless is launching a nationwide loyalty program this week for its 100-million-plus subscribers. There's a twist, though: To earn points for every dollar spent, subscribers must consent to have their movements tracked ...

Verizon boosts FiOS uploads to match downloads

Jul 21, 2014

Verizon is boosting the upload speeds of nearly all its FiOS connections to match the download speeds, vastly shortening the time it takes for subscribers to send videos and back up their files online.

The goTenna device pitch is No Service, No Problem

Jul 18, 2014

In the new age of Internet-based crowdfunding with special price offers, where startup teams try to push their product closer and closer to the gate of entry, goTenna's campaign offers a most attractive pitch. ...

Maths can make the internet 5-10 times faster

Jul 17, 2014

Mathematical equations can make Internet communication via computer, mobile phone or satellite many times faster and more secure than today. Results with software developed by researchers from Aalborg University ...

User comments : 0