Autologous muscle-derived cells may treat stress urinary incontinence

Apr 26, 2009

Researchers have confirmed that transplanting autologous muscle-derived cells (AMDC) into the bladder is safe at a wide range of doses and significantly improves symptoms and quality of life in patients with stress urinary incontinence. The study was presented at the 104th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Urological Association (AUA) and showed that the injection of muscle-derived cells was well tolerated and significantly improved symptoms.

Researchers conducted two study phases on the efficacy and safety of muscle-derived cell transplantation. In the study phases, which are ongoing, 29 women (mean age of 49.5), whose stress urinary incontinence symptoms had not improved within a year of standard therapy, received cystoscope-assisted periurethral cell injections. At the three month follow-up appointment, participants could elect a second injection of the same dose. Follow-up occurred at one, three, six and 12 months after the last injection. Clinical outcomes were evaluated with a pad weight test, a voiding diary and validated quality of life questionnaires. In the first, double-blind phase, 20 were randomized into five groups to receive one, two, four, eight or 16 x 106 AMDCs. In the second, single-blind phase, nine patients were randomized into three groups to receive 32, 64, or 128 x 106 AMDCs.

Results showed that 86.2 percent of the 29 patients elected a second injection. To date, 17 patients have reached the 12-month follow-up appointment. No serious adverse events have been encountered. Minor events occurred at similar rates among all dose groups and included pain and bruising at the muscle biopsy site, pain at the injection site, mild and self-limiting urinary retention and urinary tract infection. One patient experienced notably worsened incontinence. Quality of life measures improved in 68 percent of patients three months after the first injection and in 67 percent of patients three months after the second injection. Symptoms improved in 61 percent of patients at three months after the first injection and three months after the second injection. Urinary leaks were reduced after both injections. At 12 months, 13 of 17 patients (76.5 percent) reported an overall reduction in stress leaks and urgency compared to baseline; four reported no leaks.

"This study confirms that autologous muscle-derived cells constitute a safe and effective treatment for incontinence at various dosages," said Anthony Atala, MD, an AUA spokesman. "It is important to note that this therapy has few side effects and seems to improve symptoms for most patients in whom other therapies failed."

Source: American Urological Association

Explore further: Sierra Leone faces criticism over Ebola shutdown

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Long-term complications of melamine consumption in children

Apr 26, 2009

Children with a history of consuming melamine-contaminated milk powder are at an increased risk of developing kidney stones and other urological complications. Researchers presenting two studies at the 104th Annual Scientific ...

FDA OKs urinary infection injectable drug

Oct 18, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced approval Thursday of doripenem (Doribax) injections for the treatment of complex urinary tract infections.

FDA OKs urinary infection injectable drug

Oct 18, 2007

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced approval Thursday of doripenem (Doribax) injections for the treatment of complex urinary track infections.

Recommended for you

Sierra Leone faces criticism over Ebola shutdown

18 hours ago

Sierra Leone began the second day of a 72-hour nationwide shutdown aimed at containing the spread of the deadly Ebola virus on Saturday amid criticism that the action was a poorly planned publicity stunt.

Presence of peers ups health workers' hand hygiene

Sep 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—The presence of other health care workers improves hand hygiene adherence, according to a study published in the October issue of Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology.

Sierra Leone streets deserted as shutdown begins

Sep 19, 2014

Sierra Leone's normally chaotic capital resembled a ghost town on Friday as residents were confined to their homes for the start of a three-day lockdown aimed at halting the deadly Ebola epidemic.

Sierra Leone launches controversial Ebola shutdown

Sep 19, 2014

Sierra Leone on Friday launched a controversial three-day shutdown to contain the deadly spread of the Ebola virus, as the UN Security Council declared the deadly outbreak a threat to world peace.

User comments : 0