ACP releases new resource to help patients managing high blood pressure

Apr 21, 2009

The American College of Physicians (ACP) today released "Know Your Numbers: A Guide to Managing High Blood Pressure." Available for free to ACP member physicians to distribute to patients and their families, the guidebook and accompanying DVD -- featuring sportscaster James Brown -- will help patients learn about high blood pressure, what steps to take to control it, and how to lower the risk of heart and blood vessel problems.

Roughly one in every three adults has -- also called -- a serious medical condition in which the pressure against the walls of the is too high. Hypertension raises the risk for heart and , stroke, and many other medical problems.

"As the guidebook and DVD show, there are many ways to effectively treat high blood pressure," said Patrick C. Alguire, MD, FACP, ACP's director of education and career development. "Almost everyone with hypertension can bring their numbers down with lifestyle changes, medicines, or both."

Many people do not realize that they have high blood pressure because it is often "silent" with no obvious symptoms. For most people (about 95 percent), no single "cause" of high blood pressure is found. That's because hypertension is usually influenced by many factors, such as family history, diet, weight, and lifestyle habits. The risk of hypertension rises with age: even people with normal blood pressure at age 55 have a 90 percent chance of having high blood pressure later in life.

"It is important to get checked for hypertension," said Dr. Alguire. "It's a quick, painless, and simple measurement."

More information: www.acponline.org

Source: American College of Physicians

Explore further: Nutrition literacy needs cross-curriculum learning

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New guidelines for treating resistant hypertension

Jun 06, 2008

Resistant hypertension, blood pressure that remains above goal despite taking three antihypertensive medications or high blood pressure that is controlled but requires four or more medications to do so, may benefit from specialized ...

High blood pressure still sneaking past doctors, study shows

May 01, 2008

Despite the well-known dangers of high blood pressure, major shortfalls still exist in the screening, treatment and control of the disease even when patients are getting a doctor's care, according to a study from the Stanford ...

Recommended for you

Blending faith and science to combat obesity

28 minutes ago

Science and religion may seem like uneasy partners at times, but when it comes to promoting healthy lifestyles, one UConn Health researcher has shown they can be an effective combination.

Research project puts stroke patients back on their feet

35 minutes ago

Finding the will to exercise routinely can be challenging enough for most people, but a stroke presents even more obstacles. Yet aerobic exercise may be crucial for recovery and reducing the risk of another ...

Air quality and unconventional oil and gas sites

3 hours ago

Research suggesting air pollutants released by unconventional oil and gas production are well over recommended levels in the US is published today in the open access journal Environmental Health. High levels of benzene, hydrog ...

FDA cautions against 'undeclared' food allergens

15 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Some food labels may not reliably list all possible food allergens, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The agency added that these "undeclared allergens" are the leading cause ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.