At risk for kidney disease? Check your genes

Apr 15, 2009

Genetic differences can influence one's risk of developing proteinuria, a condition that increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). The results may be important for determining patients' health risks and for devising new medical treatments.

Approximately 12% of people in the United States have proteinuria (abnormal levels of protein lost in the urine), and African Americans and American Indians have higher risks of developing the condition than other groups. Researchers suspect that likely accounts for part of their increased risks.

Amy Mottl, MD (University of North Carolina Center), and her colleagues looked to see if they could identify the genetic causes of American Indians' increased risk for proteinuria. They studied approximately 3,500 individuals from 13 American Indian tribes enrolled in the Strong Heart Family Study funded by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. The investigators found multiple chromosomal regions that may possess that influence variation in proteinuria, especially in the setting of diabetes or hypertension.

The study's findings are preliminary and additional research is needed to determine which genes influence one's proteinuria risk. "Further exploration of the candidate genes underlying the chromosomes implicated in our study is warranted," the authors wrote. This could lead to a better understanding of how proteinuria arises and to the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment.

While this study focused on American Indians, its findings likely apply to the general population as well, where the prevalence of proteinuria is rising.

More information: The article, entitled "Linkage Analysis of Albuminuria," will appear online at jasn.asnjournals.org/ on April 15, 2009, doi 10.1681/ASN.2008080895.

Source: American Society of Nephrology (news : web)

Explore further: Research uncovers DNA looping damage tied to HPV cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Research uncovers DNA looping damage tied to HPV cancer

2 hours ago

It's long been known that certain strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause cancer. Now, researchers at The Ohio State University have determined a new way that HPV might spark cancer development – by ...

New therapy against rare gene defects

Apr 15, 2014

On 15th April is the 1st International Pompe Disease Day, a campaign to raise awareness of this rare but severe gene defect. Pompe Disease is only one of more than 40 metabolic disorders that mainly affect children under ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

HIV+ women respond well to HPV vaccine

HIV-positive women respond well to a vaccine against the human papillomavirus (HPV), even when their immune system is struggling, according to newly published results of an international clinical trial. The study's findings ...

Progress in the fight against quantum dissipation

(Phys.org) —Scientists at Yale have confirmed a 50-year-old, previously untested theoretical prediction in physics and improved the energy storage time of a quantum switch by several orders of magnitude. ...

Revealing camouflaged bacteria

A research team at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has discovered an protein family that plays a central role in the fight against the bacterial pathogen Salmonella within the cells. The so cal ...