Anxious pregnant women are more likely to have asthmatic children

Apr 15, 2009
Anxious pregnant women are more likely to have asthmatic children

(PhysOrg.com) -- Pregnant women who are stressed, particularly late in pregnancy, have an increased risk of their child going on to develop asthma, according to the latest research from Children of the 90s.

Asthma, affects around one child in every 10 and, although the causes of this respiratory condition are not yet entirely clear, it’s known that exacerbations (attacks) can be triggered by both physiological and emotional factors.

Children of the 90s monitored over 5,800 families and found that, in the group of ‘very anxious’ pregnant - 16 per cent went on to have children who developed asthma. That compares to just 10 per cent of children born to the ‘least anxious’ women. So, those who are very anxious in pregnancy, are 60 per cent more likely to have a child who later develops asthma than with a lower level of .

The research, published in the latest edition of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, test the hypothesis that mothers’ anxiety during pregnancy is associated with asthma later developing in their children.

Researcher Dr John Henderson explained that maternal anxiety symptoms during pregnancy were positively associated with asthma in their children at age seven and a half years, raising the possibility that there may be a cause-effect relationship. Women who reported anxiety and were evaluated during the pregnancy and after .

Although the mechanisms behind the relationship are not understood, it is speculated that increases in a woman’s stress hormone, cortisol, during pregnancy may affect programming of the baby’s adrenal functions or immune development.

Maternal anxiety was assessed by self-completion questionnaires that the mothers filled in at 18 and 32 weeks of pregnancy. On the basis of the responses, the researchers were able to divide the women into four groups with different levels of anxiety.

Their children were assessed for asthma at the age of seven and a half, using questionnaires completed by the mothers and bronchial hyperreactivity measurements. Skin prick tests were used to see whether a subject’s asthma was associated with allergies.

Almost 13 per cent of the children were found to have asthma. As expected, researchers confirmed a strong connection between maternal anxiety at 18 and, particularly 32 weeks of pregnancy and asthma in children aged seven and a half.

Future studies should be done to better understand these mechanisms. While enough is not known yet to recommend specific actions to prevent asthma, the authors suggest that reducing anxiety and distress during pregnancy could be helpful.

More information: Mothers' anxiety during is associated with asthma in their by Hannah Cookson, Raquel Granell, Carol Joinson, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, A. John Henderson, The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology April 2009 (Vol. 123, Issue 4, Pages 847-853.e11) http://www.jacionline.org/

Provided by University of Bristol (news : web)

Explore further: Experts question value of common superbug control practices

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

An approach to fighting the Ebola virus

10 minutes ago

Terrible suffering in Western Africa has refocused the world's attention on Ebola viruses, for which there is no vaccine or cure. The viruses are masters of their attack, but researchers are working hard to fight them, said ...

UN Ebola pointman to visit west Africa

2 hours ago

The UN's new pointman on Ebola was due to arrive in west Africa on Thursday for a visit aimed at shoring up health services in the region where at least 1,350 lives have been lost to the virus.

Two Americans with Ebola leave hospital (Update)

3 hours ago

Two American missionaries who fell ill with the dangerous Ebola virus while working in Liberia have recovered and have been released from an Atlanta hospital, doctors said Thursday.

Leprosy: Myanmar struggles with ancient scourge

7 hours ago

High in the hills of Myanmar's war-torn borderlands, a clutch of new leprosy cases among communities virtually cut off from medical help is a sign that the country's battle with the ancient disease is far from over.

User comments : 0