Comfort food? US ballpark to sell 4,800-calorie burger

Mar 25, 2009

A baseball park in Michigan has created an artery-busting hamburger containing 4,800 calories and is daring fans to eat the "snack," promising a free t-shirt to anyone who succeeds.

In an apparent bid to cook up some during hard economic times, the West Michigan Whitecaps are offering fans a behemoth dubbed the Fifth Third , named after the team's ballpark and the meal's five beef patties, which each weigh one third of a pound (136 grams).

The burger is smothered with chili, salsa, sour cream and a dollop of melted nacho-style cheese -- topped off with Frito chips, lettuce, tomato and five slices of American cheese and laid out in a bun made with a pound (454 grams) of dough.

"Besides being unique and large and bizarre, it tastes good," Whitecaps president Scott Lane told the Grand Rapids News.

"I'm sure there are going to be crazies that come down and try to eat the entire thing."

In addition to weighing in at more than double the US daily recommended caloric intake, the Fifth Third Burger contains nearly 300 grams of fat, 744 milligrams of cholesterol and more than 10,000 milligrams of sodium, the paper said.

Lane shrugged off the health implications inherent in taking on the Fifth Third.

"At home, people eat healthy. When they come to a game, they might eat a hot dog."

The season opens on April 9.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Uruguay begins registering marijuana growers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NYC french fries fail trans fats testing

Aug 02, 2007

The U.S. Center for Science in the Public Interest says both Burger King and Wendy's New York City french fries contain unsafe levels of trans fats.

Super-sizing great for your wallet but not your waist

May 06, 2008

From mega mugs of soda that don't even fit into the average car cup holder to jumbo orders of fries that could feed an elephant, many fast-food restaurants are offering super-sized portions that appear to be easy on the pocketbook.

How to... eat for health

Feb 15, 2009

Fixing these common mistakes will help many people be healthier, says Dr. Phillip Snider, a family physician in Virginia Beach, Va.

Recommended for you

Uruguay begins registering marijuana growers

11 minutes ago

Just a handful of people had registered by midday Wednesday to be private growers of marijuana in Uruguay, the first country to fully legalize the production, sale and distribution of the drug.

Tracking spending among the commercially insured

10 hours ago

Recent growth in health care spending for commercially insured individuals is due primarily to increases in prices for medical services, rather than increased use, according to a new study led by researchers at The Dartmouth ...

Taking aim at added sugars to improve Americans' health

14 hours ago

Now that health advocates' campaigns against trans-fats have largely succeeded in sidelining the use of the additive, they're taking aim at sugar for its potential contributions to Americans' health conditions. But scientists ...

User comments : 0