Therapeutic hypothermia is promising strategy to minimize tissue damage

Mar 19, 2009

Recognition of the benefits of cooling strategies to protect the brain and spinal cord after traumatic injury has led to a wealth of cutting edge research, prime examples of which are featured in a special hypothermia issue of Journal of Neurotrauma, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

The issue includes a series of original articles presenting experimental and clinical evidence to support the use of modest in specific conditions. These reports emanated from presentations at the 2nd International Brain Hypothermia Symposium and were selected for publication in the Journal by Guest Editors W. Dalton Dietrich, PhD, and M. Ross Bullock, MD, PhD, both from the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Patrick M. Kochanek, MD, from the University of Pittsburgh.

In his Introduction, Dr. Dietrich points out that many factors determine whether hypothermic therapy will be beneficial, including "how early hypothermic therapy is initiated after the insult, the duration of the hypothermic period, the degree of hypothermia, as well as the rewarming protocol. Thus, it is important that basic research studies are continuing in clinical relevant animal models to address these important questions."

The issue explores several aspects of hypothermia, including studies in animal models, its use in the operating room, and its role in the treatment of , stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage, traumatic brain (TBI) and spinal cord injury, and pediatric TBI and asphyxia.

Mackensen et al. focus on "Perioperative Hypothermia: Use and Therapeutic Implications," and Kim et al. describe "The Use of Pre-Hospital After Resuscitation from Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest." Kochanek et al. collaborate on two articles on in pediatric populations, one describing the Safar Vision, and the other focusing on applications in pediatric cardiac arrest. Shankaran presents "Neonatal Encephalopathy: Treatment with Hypothermia," and Bullock et al. provides an overview of "Current and Future Role of Therapeutic Hypothermia."

More information: The issue will be available free online at www.liebertpub.com/neu

Source: Mary Ann Liebert

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E_L_Earnhardt
not rated yet Mar 19, 2009
Hypothermia also has the option of curing cancer!
Try it and see!