Why does aspirin increase the susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori to antimicrobials?

Mar 03, 2009

Resent studies reported that aspirin inhibited the growth of H. pylori in a dose-dependent manner and significantly affected the activity of virulence factors of H. pylori. In addition, aspirin increased the susceptibility of H. pylori to antimicrlbials including metronidazole, clarithromycin and amoxicillin. However, the mechanisms remained unknown.

A research team led by Prof. Wang from Peking University First Hospital of China addressed this issue and their results will be published on February 28, 2009 in the World Journal of Gastroenterology.

H. pylori reference strain 26695 and two metronidazole-resistant isolates of H. pylori were included in this study. The effect of aspirin on the permeability of the outer membrane of H. pylori was determined using [7-3H] tetracycline. The effects of aspirin on the expression of OMPs of H. pylori were also determined. Taqman-based real-time quantitative PCR was used to analyze the influence of aspirin on the expression of the related OMPs genes.

They found that the mutations in rdxA gene did not change in metronidazole resistant isolates treated with aspirin. The radioactivity of H. pylori increased when treated with aspirin, indicating that aspirin improved the permeability of the outer membrane of H. pylori. However, the expression of two OMP bands between 55 kDa and 72 kDa altered in the presence of aspirin. The expression of the mRNA of hopA, hopB, hopC, hopD, hopE and hefA, hefB, hefC of H. pylori did not change when treated with aspirin.

Their results indicated that although aspirin increases the susceptibility of H. pylori to metronidazole, it has no effect on the mutations of rdxA gene of H. pylori. Aspirin increases endocellular concentrations of antimicrobials and probably by altering the expression of the outer membrane proteins (OMP) of H. pylori. Their study will help understand the mechanisms of the resistance of H. pylori to antibiotics more intensively and discover a more effective eradication regimen in clinical practice.

Source: World Journal of Gastroenterology

Explore further: Cricket: Mahmood calls for end to mental health 'taboo'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Mars, Saturn and the claws of Scorpius

22 minutes ago

Look up at the night sky this week and you'll find Mars and Saturn together in the west. Mars stands out with its reddish colouring and you might just be able to detect a faint yellow tinge to Saturn. ...

Freedom and responsibility of science

32 minutes ago

Yesterday, the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Leopoldina National Academy of Sciences presented their recommendations for "The Freedom and Responsibility of Science" in Berlin. Both research organizations appeal ...

The ethics of driverless cars

52 minutes ago

Jason Millar, a PhD Candidate in the Department of Philosophy, spends a lot of time thinking about driverless cars. Though you aren't likely to be able to buy them for 10 years, he says there are a number ...

Recommended for you

Medtronic spends $350M on another European deal

13 hours ago

U.S. medical device maker Medtronic is building stronger ties to Europe, a couple months after announcing a $42.9 billion acquisition that involves moving its main executive offices across the Atlantic, where it can get a ...

Mind over matter for people with disabilities

Aug 26, 2014

People with serious physical disabilities are unable to do the everyday things that most of us take for granted despite having the will – and the brainpower – to do so. This is changing thanks to European ...

Ukraine's former world's tallest man dies

Aug 25, 2014

Ukraine's tallest man, who briefly held the world record but gave it up to live as a recluse, has died due to complications from the condition that saw him never stop growing, local media reported Monday.

User comments : 0