Mood player creates the right atmosphere

Mar 03, 2009

(PhysOrg.com) -- Melancholic songs, dance rhythms or romantic background music? The mood player can recognize musical characteristics and sort songs according to moods. It also blends in suitable images to the rhythm of the music.

MP3 players and digital cameras fill home computers with a data flood of images and music. The sector association BITKOM estimated that the number of music downloads in 2008 would exceed 38 million in Germany. Until now, anyone wishing to maintain an overview of their favorite music and photos had to laboriously assign keywords to everything using cumbersome administration software.

A new approach is to sort the data according to moods. The mood player developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT in Ilmenau compiles musical slide shows to match how the user feels at the time. From euphoric, relaxed and melancholic to vigorous. The software, which is based on the GenreID music analysis tool, trains the PC to recognize different musical characteristics. Images that suit the mood are automatically added to the play list and shown at a speed that matches the tempo of the music.

For this purpose, the mood player classifies the media in real time and makes the acquired information available in a database. The mood of the images is analyzed on the basis of several distinguishing parameters, including brightness, contrast, edges, colors, textures, layout and shape. Warm colors, for instance, represent friendliness and strong emotions, whereas cold colors have a more calming, distanced and melancholic effect. Factors such as saturation, brightness, structures and the combination and arrangement of different colors are decisive in the image analysis. The pieces of music too are sorted according to mood parameters, such as volume, tone, melody, rhythm, instruments and vocals - automatically, without the need for tedious cataloging.

Provided by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft

Explore further: Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Form Devices team designs Point as a house sitter

5 hours ago

A Scandinavian team "with an international outlook" and good eye for electronics, software and design aims to reach success with what they characterize as "a softer take" on home security. Their device is ...

Man pleads guilty in New York cybercrime case

8 hours ago

A California man has pleaded guilty in New York City for his role marketing malware that federal authorities say infected more than a half-million computers worldwide.

NASA issues 'remastered' view of Jupiter's moon Europa

17 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Scientists have produced a new version of what is perhaps NASA's best view of Jupiter's ice-covered moon, Europa. The mosaic of color images was obtained in the late 1990s by NASA's Galileo ...

Dish restores Turner channels to lineup

17 hours ago

Turner Broadcasting channels such as Cartoon Network and CNN are back on the Dish network after being dropped from the satellite TV provider's lineup during contract talks.

Recommended for you

Wireless electronic implants stop staph, then dissolve

3 hours ago

Researchers at Tufts University, in collaboration with a team at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, have demonstrated a resorbable electronic implant that eliminated bacterial infection in mice ...

Scientist develops uncrackable code for nuclear weapons

9 hours ago

Mark Hart, a scientist and engineer in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Defense Technologies Division, has been awarded the 2015 Surety Transformation Initiative (STI) Award from the National ...

LiquidPiston unveils quiet X Mini engine prototype

Nov 21, 2014

LiquidPiston has a new X Mini engine which is a small 70 cubic centimeter gasoline powered "prototype. This is a quiet, four-stroke engine with near-zero vibration. The company said it can bring improvements ...

Novel robotic walker helps patients regain natural gait

Nov 21, 2014

Survivors of stroke or other neurological conditions such as spinal cord injuries, traumatic brain injuries and Parkinson's disease often struggle with mobility. To regain their motor functions, these patients ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.