Italian doctor says he has cloned three babies

Mar 03, 2009

A controversial Italian doctor known for his work allowing post-menopausal women to have children has claimed in an interview to have cloned three babies who are now living in eastern Europe.

"I helped give birth to three children with the human cloning technique," Severino Antinori, a prominent gynaecologist, told Oggi weekly in an interview to appear Wednesday.

"It involved two boys and a girl who are nine years old today. They were born healthy and they are in excellent health now."

He did not provide proof of his claims, but said cells from the three fathers, who were sterile, allowed the cloning to be carried out.

The women's egg cells were impregnated in a laboratory through a method called "nuclear transfer," he said.

Antinori, who became famous after allowing a 63-year-old woman to have a child in 1994, said "respect for the families' privacy does not allow me to go further."

He added that the method used was "an improvement" over the technique used to clone Dolly the sheep in 1996.

Reminded by the journalist that such cloning is prohibited in heavily Catholic Italy, the doctor said he preferred to "speak of innovative therapies" or "genetic recoding" rather than cloning.

Two weeks ago, Antinori sparked controversy by announcing that he would artificially impregnate a woman whose husband is in an irreversible coma following a brain tumour.

It would be the first procedure of its kind in Italy if successful.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Key element of CPR missing from guidelines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

US spy agency patents car seat for kids

50 minutes ago

Electronic eavesdropping is the National Security Agency's forte, but it seems it also has a special interest in children's car seats, Foreign Policy magazine reported Wednesday.

Saving seeds the right way can save the world's plants

1 hour ago

Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks ...

Evidence of a local hot bubble carved by a supernova

1 hour ago

I spent this past weekend backpacking in Rocky Mountain National Park, where although the snow-swept peaks and the dangerously close wildlife were staggering, the night sky stood in triumph. Without a fire, ...

Recommended for you

Exploring 3-D printing to make organs for transplants

9 hours ago

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients ...

High frequency of potential entrapment gaps in hospital beds

11 hours ago

A survey of beds within a large teaching hospital in Ireland has shown than many of them did not comply with dimensional standards put in place to minimise the risk of entrapment. The report, published online in the journal ...

Key element of CPR missing from guidelines

Jul 29, 2014

Removing the head tilt/chin lift component of rescue breaths from the latest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines could be a mistake, according to Queen's University professor Anthony Ho.

Burnout impacts transplant surgeons (w/ Video)

Jul 28, 2014

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a new national study on transplant surgeon ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

superhuman
not rated yet Mar 03, 2009
"It involved two boys and a girl...
He did not provide proof of his claims, but said cells from the three fathers, who were sterile, allowed the cloning to be carried out.


Wait, what? He produced a female by cloning a male?!

Something is seriously wrong here either with this report or with his "genetic recoding".