Record 12 pct drop for PC sales in 2009: Gartner

Mar 02, 2009
Consumers shop for laptop computers at a computer mart in Ningbo on October 15, 2008 in eastern China's Zhejiang province. Sales of personal computers are expected to decline by 11.9 percent to 257 million units in 2009, the steepest drop in the industry's history, market research firm Gartner said Monday.

Sales of personal computers are expected to decline by 11.9 percent to 257 million units in 2009, the steepest drop in the industry's history, market research firm Gartner said Monday.

"The PC industry is facing extraordinary conditions as the global economy continues to weaken, users stretch PC lifetimes and PC suppliers grow increasingly cautious," said Gartner research director George Shiffler.

The decline in PC sales in 2009 would be the worst since 2001, when unit shipments contracted 3.2 percent, Gartner said in a statement.

Both emerging and mature markets were also set to suffer unprecedented market slowdowns in 2009 with PC sales declining by 10.4 percent over last year in emerging markets and by 13 percent in mature markets.

Gartner said the previous lowest growth in emerging markets was 11.1 percent in 2002, while mature markets recorded their lowest growth in 2001, negative 7.9 percent.

Worldwide mobile PC shipments were expected to reach 155.6 million units in 2009, a nine percent increase from 2008, the research firm added.

It said desktop PC shipments were forecast to total 101.4 million units, a 31.9 per cent decline from 2008.

Much of the growth in mobile PC sales will be fuelled by shipments of mini-notebooks, Gartner said, although they were forecast to represent just eight percent of PC shipments in 2009.

Worldwide mini-notebook shipments were expected to total 21 million units in 2009, up from 11.7 million units in 2008.

Excluding mini-notebooks, mobile PC sales will grow by just 2.7 per cent in 2009, Gartner said.

"Mature markets continue to be the primary consumers of mini-notebooks, but as prices continue to fall, they are likely to attract increasing numbers of emerging market buyers," said Angela McIntyre, another Gartner research director.

(c) 2009 AFP

Explore further: Weibo IPO below expectations, raises $285.6 mn

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Samsung looks to life beyond the smartphone

Apr 13, 2014

After years of record profit growth, tech giant Samsung Electronics looks to be at a commercial crossroads as it searches for a new growth driver to counter slowing sales of its phenomenally successful smartphones.

Counting the cost of East Africa's poaching economy

Mar 23, 2014

Organised crime gangs in East Africa are generating staggering profits smuggling ivory and rhino horn with impunity, experts say, threatening both an irreplaceable wildlife heritage and key tourism industries.

Recommended for you

Weibo IPO below expectations, raises $285.6 mn

8 hours ago

Sina Weibo sold fewer shares than expected in its US IPO which was priced below expectations ahead of a Thursday listing that takes place after tech selloffs on Wall Street.

'Chief Yahoo' David Filo returns to board

9 hours ago

Yahoo announced the nomination of three new board members, including company co-founder David Filo, who earned the nickname and formal job title of "Chief Yahoo."

Fired Yahoo exec gets $58M for 15 months of work

9 hours ago

Yahoo's recently fired chief operating officer, Henrique de Castro, left the Internet company with a severance package of $58 million even though he lasted just 15 months on the job.

IBM posts lower 1Q earnings amid hardware slump (Update)

19 hours ago

IBM's first-quarter earnings fell and revenue came in below Wall Street's expectations amid an ongoing decline in its hardware business, one that was exacerbated by weaker demand in China and emerging markets.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Tailored approach key to cookstove uptake

Worldwide, programs aiming to give safe, efficient cooking stoves to people in developing countries haven't had complete success—and local research has looked into why.

A sharp eye on Southern binary stars

Unlike our sun, with its retinue of orbiting planets, many stars in the sky orbit around a second star. These binary stars, with orbital periods ranging from days to centuries, have long been the primary ...