Researchers find culture of academic institution may influence health care delivery

Feb 03, 2009

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and Brandeis University have completed a qualitative study on the cultural environment in medical schools and how this may affect medical faculty vitality, professionalism and general productivity ultimately influencing the delivery of health care. This study appeared in the January issue of Academic Medicine.

"As we interviewed faculty in academic medicine, it became clear that many faculty felt isolated and lacked support in their work. This may inadvertently be creating an environment that negates the importance of interpersonal relationships between medical practitioners and their patients," explains senior author Phyllis Carr, MD, professor of medicine and associate dean of students at Boston University School of Medicine.

A central task of medical schools is to help students, faculty and medical practitioners form caring, healing relationships with patients, their communities and each other. In medical education, effective relationship formation and trust is pivotal in learning and is helpful for interdisciplinary clinical partnerships and multidisciplinary research collaboration.

The qualitative study was conducted in five US medical schools representing the diverse organizational characteristics of the 126 medical schools in the US. Participants included research scientists, medical and surgical subspecialists and generalist medical faculty who hold doctorate degrees and represented a wide diversity of subspecialties. Of the 170 faculty members invited 96 participated in the study. These individuals were categorized into four different career stages. 1. early career; those who had been faculty members for two to five years; 2. plateaued, those who had not advanced as expected in rank and responsibility and who had been faculty members for 10 or more years; 3. faculty in leadership roles such as deans, department chairs and center directors and 4. former faculty who have left academic medicine.

The study found that serious problems exist in the relational culture affecting medical faculty vitality, professionalism, and general productivity, and are linked to retention. According to Carr, greater efforts need to be made to support faculty and create a climate of trust in medical academe.

Source: Boston University

Explore further: Researchers developing an artificial vision system for prosthetic legs to improve gait

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

What's the role of virtues in the lab?

Feb 03, 2015

The evolution of science and engineering in the 21st century has transformed the role of these professions in profound ways that affect research, scholarship and the practice of teaching in the university ...

DNA nanoswitches reveal how life's molecules connect

Jan 30, 2015

A complex interplay of molecular components governs almost all aspects of biological sciences - healthy organism development, disease progression, and drug efficacy are all dependent on the way life's molecules ...

Recommended for you

Many transplant surgeons suffer burnout

Feb 25, 2015

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a national study on transplant surgeon burnout

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.