11-gauge needle better than 14-gauge in breast biopsy

Feb 02, 2009

Stereotactic vacuum-assisted breast needle biopsy, a common minimally invasive biopsy method used in the US, is more effective with an 11-gauge needle than the 14-gauge needle decreasing a physician's chances of false-negative diagnoses, according to a study performed at the Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, CA.

The study included 1,280 breast lesions that were consecutively biopsied using a 14-gauge or 11-gauge vacuum needle. Results showed that cancer was missed in 3/68 cases (4.5%) using the 14-gauge needle and in only 2/440 (0.45%) cases using the 11-gauge needle. "The 11 gauge is more accurate than the 14," said Roger Jackman, MD, lead author of the study.

"Specimens obtained with both needles are the same length, but those with the 11-gauge needle are larger in diameter and volume which presumably leads to the better results with the 11-gauge needle. Most women say the procedure is very tolerable with less discomfort than a trip to the dentist for a filling. I feel there is much more concern waiting for the results of the biopsy rather than the procedure itself," said Dr. Jackman. "Any woman undergoing a biopsy and physician performing a biopsy wants safety and accuracy. Accuracy is absolutely critical," he said.

"This procedure is the most accurate way to biopsy an abnormality found on a mammogram. It is one that is safer and less expensive than surgical biopsy. The triple headed win of accuracy, safety and cost savings is extremely exciting and important," said Dr. Jackman.

This study appears in the February issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

Source: American Roentgen Ray Society

Explore further: The fine line between breast cancer and normal tissues

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New technique identifies cellular 'needle in a haystack'

Jul 12, 2012

Rare cells can be identified within mixed cell populations with near perfect accuracy using a detection technique devised by research teams led by Robert Wieder, MD, PhD, at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New ...

Recommended for you

The fine line between breast cancer and normal tissues

1 hour ago

Up to 40 percent of patients undergoing breast cancer surgery require additional operations because surgeons may fail to remove all the cancerous tissue in the initial operation. However, researchers at Brigham ...

Pancreatic cancer risk not higher with diabetes Rx DPP-4i

2 hours ago

(HealthDay)—There is no increased short-term pancreatic cancer risk with dipeptidyl-peptidase-4 inhibitors (DPP-4i) compared to sulfonylureas (SU) and thiazolidinediones (TZD) for glycemic control, according ...

Good bowel cleansing is key for high-quality colonoscopy

5 hours ago

The success of a colonoscopy is closely linked to good bowel preparation, with poor bowel prep often resulting in missed precancerous lesions, according to new consensus guidelines released by the U.S. Multi-Society Task ...

New rules for anticancer vaccines

6 hours ago

Scientists have found a way to find the proverbial needle in the cancer antigen haystack, according to a report published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine.

User comments : 0