Fraudulent 911 callers create havoc

Feb 01, 2009 By JORDAN ROBERTSON , AP Technology Writer
This undated booking mug provided by the Orange County District Attorney's office shows Randal Ellis. Ellis is currently serving a three year sentence for placing 185 bogus calls to 911 operators around the country. (AP Photo/Orange County District Attorney)

(AP) -- Doug Bates and his wife, Stacey, were in bed around 10 p.m., their 2-year-old daughters asleep in a nearby room. Suddenly they were shaken awake by the wail of police sirens and the rumble of a helicopter above their suburban Southern California home. A criminal must be on the loose, they thought.



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User comments : 3

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LuckyBrandon
3 / 5 (5) Feb 01, 2009
this is actually decently easy, and on a single office basis, not that hard to protect from. so why are we giving billions ot banks and car makers when this is MUCH more important.
nilbud
5 / 5 (2) Feb 01, 2009
"his numeric computer identifier, known as an IP address."
ffs
Mercury_01
5 / 5 (1) Feb 02, 2009
Good Idea!

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