Ice storm tree damage offers chance to detect emerald ash borer

Jan 29, 2009 By Jennifer Stewart
Emerald ash borer overwinters about half an inch below the bark of ash trees. In its larval stage, the insect has a creamy white, flat, segmented body. (Michigan State University photo/Dave Cappert)

(PhysOrg.com) -- Wood debris from January ice storms in Southern Indiana and Kentucky provides an opportunity for emerald ash borer detection, said one Purdue University expert.

"The silver lining in these ice storms is that homeowners and city foresters can use fallen limbs as an early detection tool for EAB," said Purdue entomologist Cliff Sadof. "When cleaning up debris, people should look closely for woodpecker damage or D-shaped exit holes in the bark. If these signs are found, the debris should be inspected for overwintering larval-stage emerald ash borers about half an inch beneath the bark's surface."


In its larval stage, emerald ash borer has a creamy white, flattened, segmented body. They can grow up to an inch in length.

"Early detection is extremely important because it gives city foresters a chance to reduce the number of ash trees destroyed by the insect through infested tree removal and insecticide treatments," Sadof said. "It also gives replacement trees a chance to grow before EAB depletes the ash population."

If signs of emerald ash borer are found in Indiana, it should be reported to the Indiana Department of Natural Resources by calling (866) NO EXOTIC (663-9684). In Kentucky, finds should be reported to the state entomologist's office at (859) 257-5838.

In addition to inspecting for signs of emerald ash borer in wood debris, it's also important that the material is disposed of properly.

Indiana's quarantine does not permit ash wood from infested counties to cross county lines. A federal quarantine also prohibits regulated ash products from leaving the state. Quarantine violations can result in large fines.

More information about emerald ash borer detection and quarantines is available online at www.entm.purdue.edu/EAB/ or by contacting Sadof at (765) 494-5983, csadof[at]purdue.edu.

Provided by Purdue University

Explore further: Fish found in suspected tsunami debris boat quarantined

Related Stories

Emerald ash borer confirmed as threat to white fringetree

Jan 15, 2015

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis), also known as EAB, is an invasive insect pest from Asia that has killed millions of trees in the United States and Canada and has caused billions of dollars of dam ...

Recommended for you

Telling the time of day by color

12 hours ago

Research by scientists at The University of Manchester has revealed that the colour of light has a major impact on how the brain clock measures time of day and on how the animals' physiology and behavior adjust accordingly. ...

Roadkill hot spots identified in California

17 hours ago

An interactive map shows how California's state highway system is strewn with roadkill "hot spots," which are identified in a newly released report by the Road Ecology Center at the University of California, Da ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.