Use texting as reminder

Jan 28, 2009 By Etan Horowitz

There are lots of things you hear while you're out that you might want to remember later, such as the name of a movie to rent, restaurants to try or shows to program on the DVR.

A free service called kwiry makes it easy to use text messages to help you remember all of these things later. Standard text messaging rates apply.

1. Go to kwiry.com and click "Sign Up."

2. Fill out all the fields and click "start using kwiry."

3. The next time you have something you want to remember, text it to 59479 (kwiry). You will be sent an e-mail with Web search results of the term you texted, and the results also can be accessed when you log into to kwiry.com.

4. You can also use shortcuts when you send text messages to kwiry. For instance, if you see something while you are out shopping and want to search for it later on Amazon.com, type "amazon" before the name of the product (i.e. "amazon Nintendo Wii"). Or if you want to see what kind of reviews a local restaurant is getting, type "Yelp" before the name of a restaurant. If you want to know about a restaurant in a different town, put a comma after the restaurant's name, and then type the city and state, i.e. "Yelp Dexter's, Orlando, FL." The search results e-mailed to you and saved in your online kwiry account will be from the specific service you indicated, such as Amazon or local business review site Yelp.

5. You can also use kwiry to do more advanced tasks, such as program your TiVo by text message. To set this, log into your kwiry profile and click on the "shortcuts" tab.

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(c) 2009, The Orlando Sentinel (Fla.).
Visit the Sentinel on the World Wide Web at www.orlandosentinel.com/
Distributed by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services.

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