E-Paper Technology Has New Possibilities in Japan

Jan 27, 2009 by John Messina weblog
E-Paper Display At Higashi-Ikebukuro Bus Stop

(PhysOrg.com) -- On January 23, 2009 e-paper testing was started in Japan around Toshima Ward Office, which is just east of JR Ikebukuro Station. A wireless network was set up at the Toshima Life and Industry Plaza and served as the emergency hub for disseminating disaster information. The test was to see how effective an e-paper display system would be in case of a local disaster.

The Toppan Printing Company offered the e-paper displays to the Ministry of Internal Affairs and the Communications Kanto Bureau of Telecommunications. Field testing was performed by having them displayed inside the Toshima Post Office and Higashi-Ikebukuro bus stop.

The electronic paper installed inside the Toshima Post Office measured approximately 3.28 feet by 10.5 feet. The e-paper display featured 240 x 768 pixels with a pixel pitch of 4mm. This pixel arrangement was made by arranging 48 x 96-pixel electronic papers in eight horizontal rows and five vertical rows.

At the Higashi-Ikebukuro bus stop a smaller display was used measuring approximately 2 feet by 1.3 feet. The e-paper display featured 144 x 96 pixels with a pixel pitch of 4mm. This display was created by arranging pieces of 48 x 96-pixel electronic paper in three vertical rows.

The e-paper display in Toshima Post Office will be remaining on display until Jan 29, 2009. The testing is also serving as a promotion for the Toppan Printing Company in using electronic paper for digital signage.

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DGBEACH
not rated yet Jan 27, 2009
E-Paper, for the uninitiated, is like an LCD display which maintains its state once the power is removed, and it is flexible. This technology is the future of small (and maybe large) displays, soon to be seen on electronic (remotely updatable)price tags in a store near you!

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