Google loses best workplace crown to NetApp

Jan 24, 2009
A view of the headquarters of the internet search engine company Google in Mountain View, California
A view of the headquarters of the internet search engine company Google in Mountain View, California. California technology firm NetApp has taken Google's crown as best company to work for in 2009, according to an annual Top 100 list published by Fortune Magazine.

California technology firm NetApp has taken Google's crown as best company to work for in 2009, according to an annual Top 100 list published by Fortune Magazine.



Content from AFP expires 1 month after original publication date. For more information about AFP, please visit www.afp.com .

Explore further: Netflix branches into films with 'Crouching Tiger' sequel

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Putting children first, when media sets its own rules

10 hours ago

In an age when a significant number of parents won't let their child walk down the street to post a letter because of "stranger danger", it's ironic that many pay little attention while media organisations ...

Battery system will be able to light 2,500 homes

9 hours ago

One of the largest, most environmentally-friendly, battery-based energy storage systems in the nation will be installed at the University of California, San Diego the campus announced today (Sept. 29).

Google fires back at Rupert Murdoch in Europe

Sep 25, 2014

Google on Thursday fired back at media mogul Rupert Murdoch, disputing a News Corp. complaint in Europe that the Internet titan has veered from the path of doing no evil.

Recommended for you

What's PayPal's first solo move?

2 hours ago

PayPal's impending split from long-time partner eBay Inc. will ratchet up its appeal to online retail competitors such as Amazon.com and give it the freedom to aggressively take on new mobile pay challeng ...

AOL to feed more video, news to Microsoft's MSN

7 hours ago

AOL will provide Microsoft's MSN with more video and additional news stories from popular sites such as The Huffington Post and TechCrunch in an expansion of a deal aimed at selling more digital advertising.

Microsoft to tap $2-trillion Indian cloud market

11 hours ago

Microsoft announced plans Tuesday to offer its commercial cloud services from Indian data centres as it seeks to tap what it calls a $2-trillion market in the country where Internet use is growing rapidly.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

paulthebassguy
5 / 5 (4) Jan 24, 2009
I think that surveys like this are just PR stunts for large companies - there are usually still condescending attitudes by managers towards staff members, and an implicit expectation for employees to work longer hours than usual.

The actual best places to work are smaller companies who are owned by down-to-earth entrepreneurs who are competent in business and also truly trust & respect their staff members, and don't brag about how good of an employer they are.
docknowledge
1 / 5 (1) Jan 24, 2009
Good point, paulthebassguy. What they mean is "best big business you have some reasonable chance of working, some day". But I do like one very honest part of the article, which is that...hey...if you give away free ski trips to employees, everybody is going to think it's "great" to work there. I worked in a company where I rarely paid for my own lunches, and where there was a keg of beer in the aisle. We all thought we were going to be rich. Did we think it was a great company? Heck, yeah! Did we care that investors couldn't possibly earn their money back, over the long term? Uh...long term? You mean after I cash in my stock options? Great for employees does not necessarily mean "good business".
ontheinternets
1 / 5 (1) Jan 25, 2009
If a company trims $5000 off the salary and puts that into conspicuous perks, it comes off as being a better place to work. The hours in practice tend to end up higher as well, since you've got to be at work to take advantage of them.

(in case it's not clear-- my experience working for 'good employers' has made me skeptical of the metrics they use to judge these things.. and I've learned that money and free time are more valuable)