Largest-ever study of US child health begins

Jan 13, 2009 By LAURAN NEERGAARD , AP Medical Writer

(AP) -- Scientists begin recruiting mothers-to-be in North Carolina and New York this week for the largest study of U.S. children ever performed - aiming eventually to track 100,000 around the country from conception to age 21.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

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