Small changes can lead to big rewards, says ASN president

Jan 13, 2009

Small changes can lead to big rewards, such as maintaining a healthy weight, American Society for Nutrition (ASN) President James O. Hill, PhD, describes in a recent report. The article, to be published in the February issue of The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, is written by Hill on behalf of a joint task force of ASN, the Institute of Food Technologists, and the International Food Information Council.

"By shifting our focus to small changes in diet and physical activity, we can prevent weight gain and potentially reduce the magnitude of the obesity problem. Large permanent changes in diet and activity are much harder to implement and sustain," said Hill. "Significant benefits to society are possible by promoting small, achievable changes."

What are some examples of small changes? Consider the following:

-- Take the stairs instead of the elevator
-- Walk an extra 2,000 steps a day
-- Reduce food portion size by 5%
-- Replace sweetened beverages with non-caloric beverages
-- Eat a nutritious breakfast

By instituting small changes in our daily lives, society can move in a positive health direction, according to the Task Force. "Obesity is a complex matter, but starting with one small step can lead to significant progress in achieving energy balance," stated Hill.

Source: American Society for Nutrition

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