3T MRI can detect wrist ligament tears, possibly eliminating need for invasive arthroscopy

Jan 06, 2009

MRI of the wrist at 3T is an effective way to detect wrist ligament tears and in some cases can avoid unnecessary surgery, according to a study performed at Neuroskeletal Imaging in Merritt Island, Florida.

The study included 49 patients who had both 3T MR and arthroscopy; 51 tears were found on arthroscopy. 41 of the 51 tears were also found using 3T MRI. "The resolution with 3T MRI is good. We are able to see the small ligaments a lot better and determine whether or not they are torn," said Thomas Magee, MD, lead author of the study.

"3T MRI is beneficial to both the patient and the physician. If there is a problem, it provides a road map for the physician to use during surgery and eliminates any type of surgery for those who have normal findings," said Dr. Magee. "We are able to see bone bruises, cysts and other things that may be pain generators instead of ligament tears," he said.

"Ligament tears are very common in people over the age of 40. Approximately 40% of all people over age 40 have some type of ligament tear," said Dr. Magee. "Trauma, wear and tear and degeneration can cause tearing of the ligaments," he said.

"If surgery is being contemplated, I advise people to have an MR scan to determine the cause of pain before arthroscopy," said Dr. Magee.

Source: American Roentgen Ray Society

Explore further: Team discovers key to preventing blindness and stroke devastation

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The latest fashion: Graphene edges can be tailor-made

45 minutes ago

Theoretical physicists at Rice University are living on the edge as they study the astounding properties of graphene. In a new study, they figure out how researchers can fracture graphene nanoribbons to get ...

Infrared imaging technique operates at high temperatures

46 minutes ago

From aerial surveillance to cancer detection, mid-wavelength infrared (MWIR) radiation has a wide range of applications. And as the uses for high-sensitivity, high-resolution imaging continue to expand, MWIR sources are becoming ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.