Keeping canines healthy -- canine teeth, that is

Dec 19, 2008
Brenda Mulherin with Couger, a patient at the Dr. W. Eugene and Linda Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center.

(PhysOrg.com) -- "Dental disease is a serious problem in pets," said Dr. Brenda Mulherin, community practice veterinarian at the Dr. W. Eugene and Linda Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center. "Signs of dental abnormalities can begin from birth with malalignment of the jaws," Dr. Mulherin said. "Young animals commonly retain their deciduous (baby) teeth and both young and adult animals can develop periodontal (gum) disease as early as six to eight months of age."

The most common type of dental illness is periodontal (gum) disease. Dr. Mulherin says that dental disease can be easily prevented. She advises pet owners to brush their pets teeth daily with a toothpaste designed for pets, not humans.

"Dental cleanings are another way that pet owners can be proactive," Dr. Mulherin said. "In the long-run periodic dental cleanings can save owners the expense of costly problems in the future as well as save their pets' teeth from being extracted."

Although it might be a bit daunting to brush your pet's teeth for the first time, Dr. Mulherin says many pets enjoy the taste of the pet toothpaste and the massaging of the gums by the brush. She advises owners to start brushing when the pet is young but encourages owners of older pets to brush their pets' teeth, as well.

Since joining the veterinary staff at the Lloyd Veterinary Medical Center (VMC) last month, Dr. Mulherin has performed numerous dental cleanings and procedures. "We commonly perform routine cleanings and extractions." Dr. Mulherin will soon be trained in performing root canals and other endodontic procedures. She has already taken several courses concentrating in small animal veterinary dentistry.

Dr. Mulherin is a 2002 graduate of Iowa State University's College of Veterinary Medicine. Previously, she was a small animal practitioner in the Des Moines area. She has given client presentations on pet care and the veterinary profession.

In addition to caring for pets at the Lloyd VMC, Dr. Mulherin teaches fourth- and third-year students in general practice.

Provided by Iowa State University

Explore further: Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tens of thousands expected at New York climate march

33 minutes ago

Celebrities, activists and political leaders are expected to join more than 100,000 people in New York Sunday for what could be the largest climate change protest in history, organizers said.

Team improves solar-cell efficiency

1 hour ago

New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago's chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular ...

Calif. teachers fund to boost clean energy bets

1 hour ago

The California State Teachers' Retirement System says it plans to increase its investments in clean energy and technology to $3.7 billion, from $1.4 billion, over the next five years.

Alibaba surges in Wall Street debut

1 hour ago

A buying frenzy sent Alibaba shares sharply higher Friday as the Chinese online giant made its historic Wall Street trading debut.

Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

1 hour ago

Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air—and the soybeans—were still?

Recommended for you

Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

Sep 19, 2014

Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air—and the soybeans—were still?

Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold

Sep 19, 2014

Some pollutants are more harmful in a cold climate than in a hot, because they affect the temperature sensitivity of certain organisms. Now researchers from Danish universities have demonstrated how this ...

Research helps steer mites from bees

Sep 19, 2014

A Simon Fraser University chemistry professor has found a way to sway mites from their damaging effects on bees that care and feed the all-important queen bee.

User comments : 0