Lower-dose fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy results in better hearing preservation

Dec 17, 2008

Researchers at Thomas Jefferson University have found that a lower dose of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas results in better hearing preservation and has the same tumor local control rate as a higher dose of therapy. The study appeared online in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics.

"We previously had not determined the optimal dose of fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for acoustic neuromas," said David W. Andrews, M.D., professor and vice-chairman of the Department of Neurological Surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, and the lead author. "This study was designed to compare the hearing preservation between the two doses. The lower-dose treatment resulted in a 100 percent tumor control rate, with the advantage of better hearing preservation."

Between 1994 and 2007, 101 patients with serviceable hearing were treated at Jefferson with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSR). Dr. Andrews and colleagues analyzed 89 patients within that cohort who had complete audiometric data available. Forty-three patients had received the high-dose of 50.4 Gruyere (Gy). Forty-six patients received the low-dose of 46.8 Gy.

The tumor local control rates were 100% for both the lower-dose cohort and the higher-dose cohort. The pure tone average was 33 decibels (dB) in the lower-dose cohort, which was significantly better than the 40 dB pure tone average in the high-dose cohort. The actuarial hearing preservation rate was also longer in the lower-dose cohort: 165 weeks vs. 79 weeks.

"This is a potentially practice-changing finding," Dr. Andrews said. "We are now working to design a study to directly compare FSR with other treatment options, including stereotactic single fraction radiosurgery."

According to Dr. Andrews, the tumor control rates for FSR are comparable to those of stereotactic single fraction radiosurgery, another treatment option for acoustic neuromas. But Dr. Andrews and colleagues found in a previous study that FSR preserves hearing better, and does not cause trigeminal or facial neuropathies.

Source: Thomas Jefferson University

Explore further: Smoking may increase risks for patients being treated for prostate cancer

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Obama recommends extended wilderness zone in Alaska

9 hours ago

US President Barack Obama said Sunday he would recommend a large swath of Alaska be designated as wilderness, the highest level of federal protection, in a move likely to anger oil proponents.

NASA craft set to beam home close-ups of Pluto

9 hours ago

Nine years after leaving Earth, the New Horizons spacecraft is at last drawing close to Pluto and on Sunday was expected to start shooting photographs of the dwarf planet.

Navy wants to increase use of sonar-emitting buoys

11 hours ago

The U.S. Navy is seeking permits to expand sonar and other training exercises off the Pacific Coast, a proposal raising concerns from animal advocates who say that more sonar-emitting buoys would harm whales and other creatures ...

Uganda seizes massive ivory and pangolin haul

11 hours ago

Ugandan wildlife officers have seized a huge haul of elephant ivory and pangolin scales, representing the deaths of hundreds of endangered animals, police said Sunday.

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.