Fear of nuts creating hysteria of epidemic proportions

Dec 10, 2008

Measures imposed to reduce exposure to nuts are often based on irrational fears of nut allergies and are becoming increasingly sensationalist, according to a doctor on bmj.com today.

A peanut on the floor of a school bus leading to evacuation and decontamination for fear that it might be eaten by the 10 year old passengers, and schools declaring themselves "nut free" by banning nuts, peanut butter, homebaked goods and any foods without ingredient labels, are just some examples cited in this article.

According to Professor Nicolas Christakis from Harvard Medical School, there is no evidence that any of these extreme restrictions work better than more circumscribed policies or that they are worth the money and disruptions they create.

In the US, 150 people die each year from food allergies. This is compared to the 50 who die from bee stings, the 100 who die from lightening strikes, the 45,000 who die in motor vehicle accidents, and the 10,000 who are hospitalised for traumatic brain injury from playing sport. But these issues do not incur such extreme reactions, such as calling for an end to sport.

Christakis says that the "gross over-reaction to the magnitude of the threat" is very similar to mass psychogenic illness (MPI), previously known as epidemic hysteria.

Often seen occurring in small towns, schools and factories, these outbreaks of MPI involve healthy people in a flow of anxiety, most often triggered by a fear of contamination. Being around individuals who are anxious heightens others' anxiety.

These extreme measures to reduce exposure to nuts are fuelling anxiety in parents, leading to more sensitisation, and creating the very epidemic they are designed to stop. A recent study has suggested that early exposure to peanuts actually reduces, rather than increases the risk of allergy.

Christakis concludes by calling for a level-headed strategy to deal with this phenomenon before it spirals out of control.

Source: British Medical Journal

Explore further: Many kidney failure patients have concerns about pursuing kidney transplantation

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Astronomers pinpoint 'Venus Zone' around stars

5 hours ago

San Francisco State University astronomer Stephen Kane and a team of researchers presented today the definition of a "Venus Zone," the area around a star in which a planet is likely to exhibit the unlivable ...

History books becoming next fight in Texas schools

6 hours ago

The next ideological fight over new textbooks for Texas classrooms intensified Wednesday with critics lambasting history lessons that they say exaggerate the influence of Moses in American democracy and negatively portray ...

Amazon deforestation up 29 pc in 2013

7 hours ago

Deforestation in the Amazon rose 29 percent between August 2012 and July of last year to 5,891 square kilometers (2,275 square miles), Brazilian officials said Wednesday, posting an amended figure.

Recommended for you

Seven US-based researchers share $1.3M eyesight prize

Sep 10, 2014

Seven U.S.-based researchers are sharing a €1 million ($1.3 million) prize from a Portuguese foundation for their work developing treatment for angiogenic diseases of the retina, the leading cause of blindness in the developed ...

Living liver donors ambivalent with donation

Sep 10, 2014

Living donors are important to increasing the number of viable grafts for liver transplantation. A new study published in Liver Transplantation, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and th ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Doug_Huffman
5 / 5 (2) Dec 10, 2008
Ignorance is a virus-like meme.

The collective's conspiracy of ignorance masquerades as common sense.
Doug_Loss
5 / 5 (1) Dec 10, 2008
Isn't it about time for those of us with some basic common sense said, "enough of this nonsense!"?
Hoarsesenz
5 / 5 (1) Dec 10, 2008
I'd say it's just a manifestation of the generally poor, rote and "monkey see, monkey do" reasoning that almost everyone uses constantly, every day, it's just that it's more obvious in this case.
freethinking
5 / 5 (2) Dec 10, 2008
I have 4 kids each with Penut and other tree nut allergies. They have eppi pens, and benadril at school. I agree the schools, and some other parents are going overboard. The school policy is if they are having even a minor allergic reaction, they are to give eppi right away. We dont want this... we want them to give benadril and watch... If they have trouble breathing.. then use the epi-pen. No sense going to the emergency room for no reason.
Please... common sense... not panic.....