Researchers Find Fingerprints in Murder Case

Dec 08, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- A pioneering forensic scientist at Northamptonshire Police and the University of Leicester has helped detectives move a step closer to solving a murder case.

Dr John Bond, Scientific Support Manager at Northamptonshire Police and Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Leicester Forensic Research Centre, is tackling a murder case on America’s Most Wanted list.

Using a revolutionary new forensic technique, Dr Bond has found fingerprints on bullet casings used in the murder.

Bullet casings from the shooting – which took place in Texas on December 9 2007 – have been analysed by Dr Bond using a method that enables scientists to visualise fingerprints even after the print itself has been removed.

The casings were brought to the UK by Detective Tony Roten from the Crimes Against Persons Section – CID, North Richland Hills Police, Texas.

Detective Roten said: “We are very pleased with Dr Bond’s work.

“There appears to be good fingerprints on one of the casings.”

Chris King, a detective from Kingsland Police Department, Georgia, recently visited the Force to see whether Dr Bond could help with a 10-year old unsolved double homicide case.

The initial findings – which identified a partial print – have enabled US officers to eliminate suspects in the case.

And Dr Bond has been receiving calls from police forces from the UK and across the Atlantic asking for help with unsolved cases.

Dr Bond said: “I have now examined in excess of 100 shell casings in the past couple of months.

“This current case for Detective Roten would appear to be the best print we have so far been able to enhance.

“We are very pleased that we have been able to help Detective Roten with this inquiry.”

Provided by University of Leicester

Explore further: Study: Alcatraz inmates could have survived escape

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

People finding their 'waze' to once-hidden streets

30 minutes ago

When the people whose houses hug the narrow warren of streets paralleling the busiest urban freeway in America began to see bumper-to-bumper traffic crawling by their homes a year or so ago, they were baffled.

Identity theft victims face months of hassle

40 minutes ago

As soon as Mark Kim found out his personal information was compromised in a data breach at Target last year, the 36-year-old tech worker signed up for the retailer's free credit monitoring offer so he would ...

Observers slam 'lackluster' Lima climate deal

50 minutes ago

A carbon-curbing deal struck in Lima on Sunday was a watered-down compromise where national intransigence threatened the goal of a pact to save Earth's climate system, green groups said.

Your info has been hacked. Now what do you do?

1 hour ago

Criminals stole personal information from tens of millions of Americans in data breaches this past year. Of those affected, one in three may become victims of identity theft, according to research firm Javelin. ...

New Bond script stolen in Sony hack

1 hour ago

An "early version" of the screenplay for the new James Bond film was the latest victim of a massive hacking attack on Sony Pictures Entertainment, its producers said in a statement on their website Sunday.

Ag-tech could change how the world eats

6 hours ago

Investors and entrepreneurs behind some of the world's newest industries have started to put their money and tech talents into farming - the world's oldest industry - with an audacious agenda: to make sure there is enough ...

Recommended for you

Study: Alcatraz inmates could have survived escape

16 hours ago

The three prisoners who escaped from Alcatraz in one of the most famous and elaborate prison breaks in U.S. history could have survived and made it to land, scientists concluded in a recent study.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.