U.S. grant will help China's new buildings go green

Dec 03, 2008 By Les Blumenthal

A $518,000 grant that will be awarded to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on Wednesday could have potentially important consequences in the effort to control global warming amid the continuing political fallout from the Kyoto climate change treaty.



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