Risk of death may be higher with drug commonly used during cardiac surgery

Dec 02, 2008

The risks of death are probably higher with aprotinin, a drug commonly used to control blood loss and transfusions during cardiac surgery, compared with lysine analogues, according to a study http://www.cmaj.ca//cgi/rapidpdf/cmaj.081109 to be published in the January 20th issue of CMAJ.

On December 3, a Health Canada expert advisory panel will meet to decide on aprotinin use. The study is being early released in advance of the meeting.

The study, a systematic review of 49 randomized trials, compared aprotinin with lysine analogues. It includes new information from The Blood Conservation Using Antifibrinolytics in a Randomized Trial (BART) study published in May which was stopped prematurely because of a significant number of deaths in patients taking aprotinin.

In the CMAJ review, while aprotinin was slightly more effective at controlling blood loss and transfusions, its higher risk of death and significantly more expensive price were deterrents for its use. The authors recommend tranexamic acid or aminocaproic as alternatives to prevent blood loss during surgery.

"Lysine analogues are almost as effective as aprotinin in controlling blood loss, are cheaper, and appear not to increase mortality," conclude Dr. David Henry and coauthors.

Source: Canadian Medical Association Journal

Explore further: Booming mobile health app market needs more FDA oversight for consumer safety, confidence

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Aprotinin associated with increased risk of death

May 14, 2008

Aprotinin is associated with a 50 per cent increase in the relative risk of death, according to a major Canadian clinical trial comparing three drugs routinely used to prevent blood loss during heart surgery. The trial, published ...

Recommended for you

FDA approves hard-to-abuse narcotic painkiller

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—A new formulation of a powerful narcotic painkiller that discourages potential abusers from snorting or injecting the drug has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Race affects opioid selection for cancer pain

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Racial disparities exist in the type of opioid prescribed for cancer pain, according to a study published online July 21 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

FDA approves tough-to-abuse formulation of oxycodone

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term, around-the-clock treatment for severe ...

Tough-to-abuse formulation of oxycodone approved

Jul 25, 2014

(HealthDay)—Targiniq ER (oxycodone hydrochloride and naloxone hydrochloride extended release) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term, around-the-clock treatment for severe pain when other ...

EU regulator: Morning-after pill OK for all women

Jul 24, 2014

(AP)—A commonly used morning-after pill is suitable for use by heavier women, the European Medicines Agency said Thursday after a review of the evidence sparked by the French manufacturer's declaration that the drugs didn't ...

User comments : 0