Left untouched, world's largest mangrove forest recovering fast

Nov 16, 2008
Devastation from the cyclone Sidr, in 2007
Locals are seen travelling in a boat near the Sunderbans mangrove forest in Bangladesh. The world's largest mangrove forest is recovering fast from one of the worst disasters in its history, a year after it was badly damaged by a devastating cyclone, according to officials.

The world's largest mangrove forest is recovering fast from one of the worst disasters in its history, a year after it was badly damaged by a devastating cyclone, Bangladesh officials say.



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MikeB
3 / 5 (8) Nov 16, 2008
But just imagine how much faster it would've recovered if they had implemented government studies and a huge mangrove trading scheme. Every business would double prices and give all the extra money to the government! That is the only rational way to handle a crisis. That mangrove swamp is the only thing standing between their children and those cyclones.

SAVE THE MANGROVES! WE CAN SOLVE IT!!!
Do it for the children.

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