Hispanics less likely to have repeat revascularizations 1 year after angioplasty

Nov 09, 2008

Hispanic patients were 57 percent less likely than Caucasian patients to undergo coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) one year after successful angioplasty, a type of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to open blockages in the coronary arteries. Hispanics also had a trend toward lower rates of overall repeat revascularization procedures including stenting and bypass surgery, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2008.

The study also found half of Hispanics undergoing PCI had diabetes — increasing their risk for heart attack. They also were more likely to have longer lesions blocking their arteries, with the average length of 15.4 millimeters (mm) compared to 14.1 mm in Caucasians.

"More Hispanics have hypertension and diabetes, especially insulin-treated diabetes," said Shailja V. Parikh, M.D., a fellow in the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas.

The study — one of the first to examine restenosis rates in Hispanics — included 542 Hispanics and 1,357 Caucasians undergoing PCI from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Dynamic Registry Waves from 1999 to 2006. Only clinical centers where 5 percent of patients were of Hispanic ethnicity were included.
Despite Hispanic patients being an average three years younger, researchers found more:

-- hypertension – 80.4 percent versus 72.3 percent in Caucasians;
-- diabetes – 49.2 percent versus 27.8 percent in Caucasians; and
-- insulin-treated diabetes – 15 percent versus 7.4 percent in Caucasians.

Hispanic participants had less:

-- peripheral vascular disease – 5.6 percent versus 10.3 percent;
-- prior heart attack – 25.8 percent versus 30.9 percent; and
-- prior PCI – 27.8 percent versus 34.1 percent than Caucasians.

Researchers found that rates of death and heart attack were similar between Hispanics and Caucasians one year after PCI.

"It's interesting that Hispanics were younger and had more risk factors," Parikh said. "With higher rates of insulin treated diabetes, hypertension, and longer lesion lengths, one would expect Hispanic patients to have higher rates of repeat revascularization either though CABG or PCI. However, despite having these risk factors for increased rates of restenosis, Hispanics were found to be revascularized less often after initial PCI than their Caucasian counterparts.

"It is possible that a referral bias exists in which Hispanic patients are not being referred for coronary artery bypass surgery as commonly as Caucasians," Parikh said. "Or, there may be mediating factors intrinsic to the Hispanic patient that could be protective toward restenosis."

Parikh advocates for increased preventive measures and for modification of risk factors among these patients before they reach the cath labs. Better control of the unique set of risk factors in Hispanics could decrease the need for downstream invasive interventions.

Parikh and colleagues are planning to do further research on Hispanics in Dallas, where one-third of all patients undergoing cardiac catheterization at the Parkland Memorial Hospital catheterization laboratories are Hispanic.

According to the American Heart Association, data from the National Health Interview Survey 2005 study of the National Center for Health Statistics showed that among Hispanics/Latinos age 18 and older, 8.3 percent have heart disease, 5.9 percent have coronary heart disease, 20.3 percent have hypertension, and 2.2 percent have had a stroke.

Source: American Heart Association

Explore further: Allergan to cut 1,500 employees in restructuring (Update)

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Kingston, Jamaica hybrid project to harness sun and wind

7 hours ago

A hybrid energy project in Kingston, Jamaica, aims to satisfy the need for money-saving renewable energy. U.S.-based WindStream Technologies recently announced the wind solar hybrid installation commissioned ...

Archaeologists excavate NY Colonial battleground

7 hours ago

Archaeologists are excavating an 18th-century battleground in upstate New York that was the site of a desperate stand by Colonial American troops, the flashpoint of an infamous massacre and the location of the era's largest ...

Google eyes Chrome on Windows laptop battery drain

15 hours ago

Google Chrome on Microsoft Windows has been said to have a problem for some time but this week comes news that Google will give it the attention others think the problem quite deserves. Namely, Google is to ...

Security contest techies say they hacked Tesla Model S

17 hours ago

The good news: Tomorrow's cars are computers on wheels. The bad news: Tomorrow's cars are computers on wheels. Ma Jie, writing in Bloomberg News, reported this week that the Tesla Model S sedan was the target ...

Water problems lead to riots, deaths in South Africa

18 hours ago

Three babies who died from drinking tap water contaminated by sewage have become a tragic symbol of South Africa's struggle to cope with a flood of people into cities designed under apartheid to cater to ...

Recommended for you

Face transplants change lives, identity

2 hours ago

Patients are prepared to take significant risks in order to be considered for a face transplant, says Dr David Koppel, director of the largest craniofacial unit in the UK and Honorary Clinical Associate Professor ...

British Lords hold ten-hour debate on assisted dying

Jul 19, 2014

Members of Britain's unelected House of Lords spent almost ten hours on Friday discussing whether to legalise assisted dying, in an often emotional debate putting the question back on the agenda, if not on the statute books.

AbbVie, Shire agree on $55B combination

Jul 18, 2014

The drugmaker AbbVie has reached a deal worth roughly $55 billion to combine with British counterpart Shire and become the latest U.S. company to seek an overseas haven from tax rates back home.

User comments : 0