Cancer cure in a sponge? Institute tests synthetic version of substance

Oct 26, 2008 By Robyn Shelton

A sponge that lives in the ocean depths off Florida's coastline holds a compound that might fight pancreatic and colon cancers.



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Explore further: US Oks first-ever DNA alternative to pap smear

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Wasabi
2 / 5 (1) Oct 27, 2008
While this is not without interest, the use of the word 'cure' makes me shudder every time the word is inappropriately used in scientific articles such as it is here. :(
E_L_Earnhardt
1 / 5 (1) Oct 27, 2008
Poisen for a cure? No thanks!
biohazzard
not rated yet Nov 01, 2008
you can kill cells in dishes with just about anything. the question is whether they can inhibit the growth of tumors of eliminate them in animal models without cousin serious side effects.

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