Drug may reduce coronary artery plaque

Oct 12, 2008

Research presented at the 20th annual Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, sponsored by the Cardiovascular Research Foundation (CRF), suggests that olmesartan, a drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure, may play a role in reducing coronary plaque.

The trial, "Impact of OLmesartan on progression of coronary atherosclerosis; evaluation by IVUS [OLIVUS], was performed on 247 angina patients with native coronary artery lesions. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 20-40mg/day of olmesartan or control, and treated with a combination of β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics, nitrates, glycemic control agents and/or statins per physician's guidance.

Serial Intravenous Ultrasound (IVUS) examinations were performed to assess the amount of coronary plaque before and 14 months after the start of treatment.

At the start of the trial, patient characteristics and all IVUS measurements were identical between the two groups. However, after 14 months of treatment, IVUS showed significant decreases in measurements of plaque volume in the olmesartan group, despite similar blood pressure readings.

In addition, multivariate analysis identified olmesartan administration as one of the factors that caused the decrease in plaque volume.

"Management of plaque is a key front in the war on sudden heart attack," said Atsushi Hirohata, M.D, Ph.D, Cardiovascular Medicine, the Sakakibara Heart Institute of Okayama, Okayama, Japan and lead author of the study. "These results suggest a positive role in potential plaque regression through the administration of olmesartan, an angiotension-II receptor blocking agent, for patients with stable angina pectoris."

Source: Cardiovascular Research Foundation

Explore further: First trial results show GSK/NIH Ebola candidate vaccine has acceptable safety profile

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Satellites, mathematics and drones take down poachers in Africa

1 hour ago

In 2014, 1,215 rhinos were killed in South Africa for their horns, which end up in Asia as supposed cures for a variety of ailments. An estimated 30,000 African elephants were slaughtered last year for their tusks to be turned into trinkets. The world loses three rhinos a day and an elepha ...

Image: Striking lightning from space

1 hour ago

Lightning illuminates the area it strikes on Earth but the flash can be seen from space, too. This image was taken from 400 km above Earth in 2012 by an astronaut on the International Space Station travelling ...

Recommended for you

Generic form of nexium approved

Jan 26, 2015

(HealthDay)—The first generic version of the heartburn drug Nexium (esomeprazole) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.