Beaches once thick with birds quiet thanks to Ike

Oct 04, 2008 By MICHAEL GRACZYK , Associated Press Writer
Birds fly around as others sit on a pier damaged by Hurricane Ike Thursday, Oct. 2, 2008 in Gilchrist, Texas. One of North America's renowned bird migration and bird watching areas is strangely silent in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

(AP) -- One of North America's renowned bird migration and bird watching areas is strangely silent. Blame Hurricane Ike.



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