Television viewing and aggression: Some alternative perspectives

Oct 01, 2008

The effect of media violence on behavior is not only an interesting psychological question but is also a relevant public policy and public health issue. Although many studies have been conducted examining the link between violence on TV and aggressive behavior, most of these studies have overlooked several other potentially significant factors, including the dramatic context of the violence and the type of violence depicted as well as the race and ethnicity of the viewers.

In a new study appearing in the September issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, psychologists Seymour Feshbach from the University of California, Los Angeles and June Tangney from George Mason University investigated the effect that exposure to violent TV programs has on negative behavior in children from different ethnic backgrounds.

To investigate this connection, the psychologists conducted a study that evaluated TV viewing habits, intelligence, and behavior in 4th, 5th and 6th grade children. To assess these qualities, the children's parents and teachers completed behavioral questionnaires detailing the children's aggression, delinquency and cruelty. The children took IQ tests and completed surveys indicating the TV programs (which were later categorized as violent or non-violent by the researchers) they had watched during a seven day time period.

The results showed a positive relationship between the amount of violent TV watched and negative personality attributes among white males and females and African-American females. Interestingly though, while there was a correlation between watching violent TV and lower academic performance in African-America males, these boys did not exhibit increased aggression or lower IQ.

The authors speculate that perhaps for African-American males, viewing TV (including violent programs) may play a different role than for white males and African-American and white females. The researchers noted, "The data raise the possibility that processes competing with or overriding the aggression stimulating or aggression modeling effects of viewing violence on television may be more salient for African-American males." For example, viewing TV shows where violent behavior is punished may inhibit feelings of aggression to a greater degree in African-American males. In any case, additional research is required to assess the effects on African-American males of viewing TV aggression.

The authors also suggest that when studying the effect of TV violence on aggression, researchers and policy makers must recognize "the need for a more general conceptualization of the effects of exposure to TV violence, one that takes into account personality differences, ethnic differences, the social context in which TV is viewed, variations in the dramatic context, and other potentially significant moderating factors."

Source: Association for Psychological Science

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superhuman
5 / 5 (1) Oct 01, 2008
Correlation is not causation, maybe people who are naturally violent choose violent tv programs.

The proper test should be performed by taking identical twins and making them watch different tv programs - one should view programs with violence and the other without, afterwards their behavior should be assessed, then after short break the study should be repeated but with the programs switched.

Results obtained that way would be much more meaningful as most confounding variables would be eliminated, of course its much more work for researchers so they rather go the easier way. With so many useless psychological research no one will rise any objections anyway.
dirk_bruere
1 / 5 (1) Oct 02, 2008
Also worth studying would be the correlation with testosterone levels.
fuchikoma
not rated yet Oct 02, 2008
I take it this was all American television?
Here in Canada, we see mostly American TV, followed by Canadian, and maybe British in third? Our censors are far more likely to censor violence and allow sex, while Americans will censor sex and allow violence.

The textbook case of this is Radiohead's video for "Paranoid Android" which is completely done in comical simple cartoon form, but at once point a man walks onto a bridge, hacks off his arms and legs and falls into the water, only to be bandaged and carried off by bare-breasted mermaids - in the USA, they blurred the breasts. In Canada, they zoomed in a little so you couldn't see his stumps before he fell into the water.

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