Caffeine experts call for warning labels for energy drinks

Sep 24, 2008

Johns Hopkins scientists who have spent decades researching the effects of caffeine report that a slew of caffeinated energy drinks now on the market should carry prominent labels that note caffeine doses and warn of potential health risks for consumers.

"The caffeine content of energy drinks varies over a 10-fold range, with some containing the equivalent of 14 cans of Coca-Cola, yet the caffeine amounts are often unlabeled and few include warnings about the potential health risks of caffeine intoxication," says Roland Griffiths, Ph.D., one of the authors of the article that appears in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence this month.

The market for these drinks stands at an estimated $5.4 billion in the United States and is expanding at a rate of 55 percent annually. Advertising campaigns, which principally target teens and young adults, promote the performance-enhancing and stimulant effects of energy drinks and appear to glorify drug use.

Without adequate, prominent labeling; consumers most likely won't realize whether they are getting a little or a lot of caffeine. "It's like drinking a serving of an alcoholic beverage and not knowing if its beer or scotch," says Griffiths.

Caffeine intoxication, a recognized clinical syndrome included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders and the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, is marked by nervousness, anxiety, restlessness, insomnia, gastrointestinal upset, tremors, rapid heartbeats (tachycardia), psychomotor agitation (restlessness and pacing) and in rare cases, death.

Reports to U.S. poison control centers of caffeine abuse showed bad reactions to the energy drinks. In a 2007 survey of 496 college students, 51 percent reported consuming at least one energy drink during the last month. Of these energy drink users, 29 percent reported "weekly jolt and crash episodes," and 19 percent reported heart palpitations from drinking energy drinks. This same survey revealed that 27 percent of the students surveyed said they mixed energy drinks and alcohol at least once in the past month. "Alcohol adds another level of danger," says Griffiths, "because caffeine in high doses can give users a false sense of alertness that provides incentive to drive a car or in other ways put themselves in danger."

A regular 12-ounce cola drink has about 35 milligrams of caffeine, and a 6-ounce cup of brewed coffee has 80 to 150 milligrams of caffeine. Because many energy drinks are marketed as "dietary supplements," the limit that the Food and Drug Administration requires on the caffeine content of soft drinks (71 milligrams per 12-ounce can) does not apply. The caffeine content of energy drinks varies from 50 to more than 500 milligrams.

"It's notable that over-the-counter caffeine-containing products require warning labels, yet energy drinks do not," says Chad Reissig, Ph.D., one of the study's authors.

Griffiths notes that most of the drinks advertise their products as performance enhancers and stimulants – a marketing strategy that may put young people at risk for abusing even stronger stimulants such as the prescription drugs amphetamine and methylphenidate (Ritalin). A 2008 study of 1,253 college students found that energy drink consumption significantly predicted subsequent non-medical prescription stimulant use, raising the concern that energy drinks might serve as "gateway" products to more serious drugs of abuse. Potentially feeding that "transition" market, Griffiths says, are other energy drinks with alluring names such as the powdered energy drink additive "Blow" (which is sold in "vials" and resembles cocaine powder) and the "Cocaine" energy drink. Both of these products use the language of the illegal drug trade.

Source: Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions

Explore further: Income is a major driver of avoidable hospitalizations across New Jersey

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Smart cup Vessyl is for drinking to quantified self

Jun 14, 2014

Doctors who care not only about human wellness but the economic waste of an inefficient health system riddled with wasted dollars on wrong medication, obesity, substance abuse and substandard medical team ...

The first caffeine-'addicted' bacteria

Mar 27, 2013

Some people may joke about living on caffeine, but scientists now have genetically engineered E. coli bacteria to do that—literally. Their report in the journal ACS Synthetic Biology describes bacteria bein ...

Recommended for you

Older adults are at risk of financial abuse

3 hours ago

Nearly one in every twenty elderly American adults is being financially exploited – often by their own family members. This burgeoning public health crisis especially affects poor and black people. It merits the scrutiny ...

Medical internet could transform health care

3 hours ago

The medical Internet is not yet here, but the widespread availability of electronic medical records and enhanced data-storage capabilities are pushing it closer to reality. As now envisioned, this new cyberspace ...

User comments : 7

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

ShadowRam
3.2 / 5 (5) Sep 24, 2008
I agree, these energy drinks are getting out of hand.
ZeroDelta
2.6 / 5 (5) Sep 24, 2008
The effects of caffeine are worse than most think
GrayMouser
1 / 5 (2) Sep 24, 2008
First they want to turn your beer in to fuel. Now they want to make espresso a prescription drug.
Arikin
1 / 5 (2) Sep 24, 2008
This type of "self medication" will continue even with the labels. Parents that care of course will read and limit consumption by their children. But the High school and college aged will continue and even boast of higher levels.
Jens
1 / 5 (1) Sep 25, 2008
I love energy drinks on my heavy lifting days.

Education, not regulation!!!
superhuman
not rated yet Oct 01, 2008
Too much caffeine results in anxiety and other unpleasant effects which should quickly teach any user how much they can drink.
Its probably more dangerous to people with hearth problems who accidentally drink it then to teens.
bmcghie
not rated yet Oct 02, 2008
If I ever need a prescription to get espresso, they'll find out what truly unpleasant effects caffeine (or lack thereof) can have.