At 15 feet, Ike's storm surge less than predicted

Sep 14, 2008 By BRIAN SKOLOFF , Associated Press Writer
A cemetery flooded by storm surge from Hurricane Ike is shown, Saturday, Sept. 13, 2008, in Galveston, Texas. Howling ashore with 110 mph winds, Hurricane Ike ravaged the Texas coast Saturday, flooding thousands of homes and businesses, shattering windows in Houston's skyscrapers and knocking out power to millions of people. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

(AP) -- Forecasters warned of "certain death," a possible 25-foot surge of water that would wash across the Texas and Louisiana coast, wiping away towns in a white-capped, churning mess of debris.



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