With Ike, size matters for killer storm surge

Sep 12, 2008 By SETH BORENSTEIN , AP Science Writer
Dawson Voris, 9, of Corpus Christi, Texas, walks through storm surge water from Hurricane Ike as the water pushes over the Padre Balli Park beach in Padre Island, Texas, and into the parking lot Thursday, Sept. 11, 2008. (AP Photo/Corpus Christi Caller-Times,Todd Yates)

(AP) -- Hurricane Ike's gargantuan size - not its strength - will likely push an extra large storm surge inland in a region already prone to it, experts said Thursday.



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