Terrorism: What the next president will face

Sep 10, 2008

Philadelphia, PA (Sept. 10, 2008) On the seventh anniversary of the September 11th attacks, what is the nature of the terrorist threat against the United States and other nations of the world and how should the next President address that threat upon taking office in January 2009?

These questions are at the center of a special volume of The Annals edited by Richard A. Clarke, as well as in a series of interviews with terrorism experts featured in the volume conducted by Philadelphia Inquirer foreign policy columnist Trudy Rubin, available at: go.philly.com/trudyrubin.

The authors in the volume, including Clarke, Peter Bergen, Kenneth Pollack and Bruce Riedel, examine questions ranging from whether al Qaeda remains a serious threat to the probability of another attack on the U.S. in the next five years. They also discuss the little examined threat from European terrorists and present strategies for fighting the terrorist training grounds in the tribal lands of Pakistan bordering Afghanistan.

The ANNALS July 2008 volume Terrorism: What the Next President Will Face is available free of charge until January 20, 2009 at ann.sagepub.com/content/vol618/issue1. On September 11, 2008, the Philadelphia Inquirer will post the series of in-depth podcasts of columnist Trudy Rubin interviewing several of the volume's authors.

The United States' approach to fighting terrorism is among the most debated issues in the 2008 presidential campaign. The new administration will face an immediate need to address Islamist extremist terrorism and develop a long-term strategy that will shape U.S. interests abroad and life at home. This special volume of the ANNALS provides valuable insight that can help influence policy choices and strategies for addressing the challenges of combating terrorism.

Special editor Richard A. Clarke served the past three presidents as a senior White House advisor on counterterrorism. Clarke has pulled together a panel of distinguished scholars and experts to prepare a detailed background and agenda for a U.S. strategy to address the problem of Islamist extremist terrorism.

"Like the cold war, this struggle is ideological at its root and will likely take many years to end," writes Clarke in the introduction. "As with the cold war, however, skillful management could eventually cause the threat to go away, not with a bang but with a whimper."

The authors provide a snapshot of terrorism around the world – from Iran to Indonesia, from Europe to Pakistan, from Iraq to the United States – and offer recommendations for the next president to combat terrorism. This volume covers nuclear terrorism, the fight against al-Qaeda and its franchises, efforts to prevent further radicalization abroad and at home, terrorist financing, counterterrorism intelligence, and the tools necessary to win the war on terrorism.

The volume is divided into four parts. Al Qaeda's Incarnations examines the recent status of this violent and well-known Islamist extremist group. Motivations attempts to explain the impetus for terrorists to carry out violence against innocent people. Specific U.S. Policies and Programs reviews important areas of expertise where the United States must succeed in order to counter violent groups. Overall U.S. Strategy proposes ways to develop broad strategies to counter violent Islamist extremists.

Source: SAGE Publications

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Modernmystic
4 / 5 (1) Sep 10, 2008
So...how is this science and not politics?
COCO
not rated yet Sep 15, 2008
I think it is neither - it is propoganda - "al Qaeda" was a construct of the CIA - Bin Laden is Bin Dead since 02 and the neocon run is petering out - at least we can hope.