Solid-state drive sets speed record

Sep 04, 2008

Engineers and researchers at the IBM Hursley development lab in England and Almaden Research Center in California have set a record in storage speed, outperforming the current rate by more than 250 percent. By combining Flash solid-state technology and IBM's storage virtualization technology, the researchers were able to transfer data at more than 1 million Input/Output (I/O) per second.

The results have profound implications, especially for businesses that rely on computational speed such as reservation systems and financial trading systems. Solid state storage is faster than traditional disk drives because it uses no moving parts. It also requires less floor space and energy. But experts say achieving gains will need more than new hardware.

The results were achieved using Flash solid-state technology coupled with IBM's industry leading, highly scalable storage virtualization technology. Under the codename "Project Quicksilver," IBM achieved groundbreaking results in transferring data at a sustained rate of over one million Input/Output (I/O) per second -- with a response time of under one millisecond (ms). Compared to the fastest industry benchmarked disk system Quicksilver improved performance by 250 percent at less than 1/20th the response time, took up 1/5th the floor space and required only 55 percent of the power and cooling.

Performance improvements of this magnitude can have profound implications for business, allowing 2-3 times the work to complete in a given timeframe for classic workloads, enabling tremendous efficiency for time sensitive applications like reservations systems, and financial program trading systems, and creating opportunity for entirely new insights in information warehouses and analytic solutions.

Details of the SAN Volume Controller SPC-1 Results are available at: www.storageperformance.org/res… _results_spc1#a00052 When compared with the IBM System Storage SAN Volume Controller using traditional disk storage devices.

Provided by IBM

Explore further: Life-saving train design is rarely used

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Wireless sensors make aircraft maintenance more efficient

Feb 24, 2015

The FLITE-WISE project has developed new wireless sensors to facilitate the constant monitoring of European aircrafts. The new system, which is expected to bring both cost and weight down, will be commercialised ...

Breakthrough results on directed self-assembly reported

Feb 19, 2015

At next week's SPIE advanced lithography conference, to be held in San Jose, Calif., Feb. 22-26, imec will present breakthrough results on Directed Self-Assembly (DSA) process development. Together with semiconductor ...

Recommended for you

Florentine basilica gets high-tech physical

16 hours ago

Late last year, two University of California, San Diego students set out for Florence, Italy, to diagnose a patient that had no prior medical record, couldn't be poked or prodded in any way, and hadn't been ...

Radar sensors support parking management

17 hours ago

Siemens is researching the use of sensor networks in an advanced parking management solution that will hopefully counter the increasing parking space crisis in cities. The online magazine Pictures of the ...

SatisFactory project for more attractive factories launched

18 hours ago

Known as either "Industrial Revolution 4.0" or as "Industrial Renaissance", the need for visionary industrial approaches is widely recognized in the European Union. SatisFactory, a three-year research project funded by the ...

Life-saving train design is rarely used

Feb 25, 2015

(AP)—Nearly a decade ago, the U.S. secretary of transportation stood at the site of a horrendous commuter train crash near downtown Los Angeles and called for the adoption of a new train car design that ...

Lexus tops auto dependability survey

Feb 25, 2015

(AP)—Lexus is the most dependable car brand for the fourth consecutive year in rankings that increasingly hinge on high-tech features.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.