Shuttle's mini PC goes easy on power consumption

Aug 22, 2008 by Lisa Zyga weblog
The Shuttle X27 PC shown to scale. Credit: Shuttle.

Shuttle, the Taiwan-based computer manufacturer, has been known for making small computers, but its newest PC will be its tiniest and greenest yet.

Called the X27, the mini PC will run on Intel´s low-power Atom processor. When in use, the computer uses 36 watts of power, and just 23 watts while in idling mode. Even when running at full speed, Shuttle claims the computer´s noise level reaches just 23 decibels, similar to a very small fan.

Although it varies, most desktop PCs use between 70 and 100 watts, but some can eat up to 250 watts (not including the monitor). Laptops consume considerably less, anywhere from 15 to 45 watts. So the X27 would be comparable to a typical laptop in terms of energy usage, and could cut a desktop user´s power bill in half.

At 10 inches long, 7 inches wide, and 2.75 inches tall, the X27 is also significantly smaller than most other PCs. It´s about the same size as Asus´ Atom-based Eee Box (which sells for $350). As a so-called "Nettop" (low-cost desktop), the X27 will likely compete with tiny computers such as the Eee Box and Dell´s Studio Hybrid, which uses Intel´s Core2Duo processor.

Specific features of the X27 include an Intel 945GC chipset, Intel GMA 950 onboard video, 4 USB 2.0 ports, a gigabit Ethernet port, and analog 5.1-channel audio.

Shuttle plans to launch the X27 in the US in mid-September, and will likely release it in the UK, although it´s not confirmed. The company has not announced pricing.

The X27 will also be on display at the IFA consumer electronics show, which starts on August 29 in Berlin.

More information: http://us.shuttle.com

via: Smart Planet

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