Treatment with anti-anemia drugs may not be safe for multiple myeloma patients

Aug 04, 2008

A recent study published in American Journal of Hematology demonstrated that Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs), a widely used drug to treat anemia, may have a negative impact on the survival of myeloma patients. In the study, 323 multiple myeloma patients were evaluated over a 20 year period in Greece from 1988 to 2007. The investigators reviewed their medical records and observed an association between ESA exposure and a reduction in progression-free and overall survival.

The study demonstrated that ESA administration may influence the course of the disease, in that people who received ESA may progress earlier than those who did not receive ESA. The median survival rate was 31 months for patients who were administered ESAs, compared to 67 months in those who were not exposed to ESAs. The median progression-free survival for patients in the ESA group was 14 months, and 30 months for those without ESA exposure.

For the past 15 years, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents have been used in the management of cancer-related anemia, but researcher Eirini Katodritou stresses the possible harmful effects ESAs may have on cancer patients. "Physicians should use ESAs with caution, based on the International Guidelines for ESA administration in cancer and on certain prognostic indicators to guide their use. Physicians need to identify the appropriate group of cancer patients who will benefit from ESA administration, while avoiding possible detrimental effects," said Katodritou.

The question of whether ESAs are harmful in patients with myeloma is a pressing clinical issue with at least eight prospective controlled clinical trials in the last five years reporting poorer outcomes with ESA use in patients with cancer, according to Dr. David P. Steensma of the Mayo Clinic. However, only two of those studies included some patients with myeloma.

Dr. Steensma pointed out that the patients in the retrospective Greek study were imbalanced for many of the known prognostic markers in myeloma, indicating that sicker patients were given ESAs preferentially and that this group would have been predicted to do more poorly anyway. Although this imbalance might explain the results, Dr. Steensma discussed the importance of additional prospective studies of ESA safety in myeloma and other forms of cancer.

Source: Wiley

Explore further: Evidence lacking for long-term opioid use in low back pain

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Pyridoxine-doxylamine drug safety data lacking

20 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—The most commonly prescribed drug for pregnant women suffering from morning sickness in their first trimester does not prevent birth defects even though drug safety data says it does, according to research ...

FDA approves new type 2 diabetes drug

Apr 15, 2014

(HealthDay)—Millions of Americans with type 2 diabetes have a new treatment option with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's approval Tuesday of a once-weekly injectable drug, Tanzeum.

User comments : 0

More news stories

Firm targets 3D printing synthetic tissues, organs

(Medical Xpress)—A University of Oxford spin-out, OxSyBio, will develop 3D printing techniques to produce tissue-like synthetic materials for wound healing and drug delivery. In the longer term the company ...

Survival hope for melanoma patients thanks to new vaccine

(Medical Xpress)—University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that a new trial vaccine offers the most promising treatment to date for melanoma that has spread, with increased patient survival rates and improved ability ...

New clinical trial launched for advance lung cancer

Cancer Research UK is partnering with pharmaceutical companies AstraZeneca and Pfizer to create a pioneering clinical trial for patients with advanced lung cancer – marking a new era of research into personalised medicines ...

Biologists help solve fungi mysteries

(Phys.org) —A new genetic analysis revealing the previously unknown biodiversity and distribution of thousands of fungi in North America might also reveal a previously underappreciated contributor to climate ...

Robotics goes micro-scale

(Phys.org) —The development of light-driven 'micro-robots' that can autonomously investigate and manipulate the nano-scale environment in a microscope comes a step closer, thanks to new research from the ...