3-D Views Posted From NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander

Jul 18, 2008
This colorglyph, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 8, the eighth Martian day of the mission (June 2, 2008), shows a stereoscopic 3D view of the Martian surface near the lander. This area is part of Phoenix's workplace and is informally called "Wonderland." The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver. Image: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University

(PhysOrg.com) -- NASA's Phoenix Mars Mission has released stereo images of the Martian surface near the Phoenix lander. The images in the new 3-D Gallery combine views from the left and right "eyes" of the lander's Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) so that they appear three-dimensional when viewed through red-blue glasses.

The first 14 images in the gallery were handpicked by Mark Lemmon, SSI lead scientist from Texas A&M University, College Station. The camera took them images between the eighth Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 2, 2008) and the 36th sol (July 1, 2008).

Red and blue 3D glasses (red for left eye, blue for right eye) are needed to properly view these stereo images

The Phoenix mission is led by Peter Smith of the University of Arizona with project management at JPL and development partnership at Lockheed Martin, Denver. International contributions come from the Canadian Space Agency; the University of Neuchatel; the universities of Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark; Max Planck Institute, Germany; and the Finnish Meteorological Institute.

3-D Gallery: www1.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/images/index.html

Provided by NASA

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User comments : 3

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dbren
5 / 5 (1) Jul 18, 2008
It would be nice if they would provide these as side-by-side pairs for freeviewing. I don't usually carry red/blue glasses around with me.
deatopmg
not rated yet Jul 18, 2008
side by side would allow true color too
DonR
not rated yet Jul 21, 2008
I don't usually carry red/blue glasses around with me.


You don't? Obviously not a child of the eighties. :)

Anyone care to speculate on how long before we see an Omnimax 3D movie of Mars?

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