OSU's Transparent Electronics Key to Solar Energy Breakthrough

Jun 17, 2008

Transparent transistors and optoelectronics created by researchers at Oregon State University and HP have found their first key industrial application in a new type of solar energy system that its developers say will be four times more cost-efficient than any existing technology.

Xtreme Energetics, Inc., of Livermore, Calif., announced they will use the OSU inventions, on which HP holds the exclusive licensing rights, in technology they believe will convert sunlight to electricity at twice the efficiency and half the cost of traditional solar panels.

OSU and Xtreme Energetics are pursuing continued collaborative research on this solar technology. HP has funded some of OSU’s research in advanced materials, collaborated with the university to invent transparent transistor technology, and is now making this technology available worldwide through its intellectual property licensing group.

Although this is one of the first applied uses of transparent electronics, it had not even been envisioned when OSU researchers in recent years developed the world’s first completely transparent integrated circuit from inorganic compounds.

“After the first discoveries with transparent electronics, we were thinking of applications like transparent displays or consumer electronics,” said John Wager, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at OSU. “But as with any breakthrough, sometimes at first you can’t even see all the possible uses. The potential to create solar energy technology that’s far more efficient and affordable is very exciting.”

Wager said that the concepts being developed by Xtreme Energetics should be an excellent fit with the capabilities of transparent electronics and integrated circuits.

“The approach being used by Xtreme Energetics is innovative, it involves a very new way to optimize solar energy collection,” Wager said. “Clearly there will be some challenges we will have to work through, but there do not appear to be any major problems. We’re all optimistic that this system is going to work. And there are still many other potential applications of transparent electronics as well.”

Most advanced solar energy systems use mechanical means to track the sun and optimize the concentration of energy. The system developed by Xtreme Energetics - which the use of transparent electronics will facilitate - has an optical approach to tracking and focusing the light. By eliminating mechanical tracking and using a flat design that could be implemented either on rooftop panels or central utilities, company officials say they can achieve an “ultra-high” level of solar energy efficiency that will be far more cost-competitive with other energy forms.

OSU announced just two years ago that it had created the world’s first transparent integrated circuit, based on fundamental materials science research in the College of Engineering and the College of Science at the university. The work is also affiliated with the Oregon Nanoscience and Microtechnologies Institute, an Oregon-based collaboration of universities, private industries and the state.

The work has moved rapidly from fundamental development of new compounds – amorphous oxide semiconductors – to applied uses, in part because researchers were quick to cast aside approaches that might have been scientifically interesting but impractical for real use.

“We didn’t even try to work with some metals such as gold and silver which are too expensive, or others such as mercury or lead that might have environmental concerns,” Wager said. “We knew all along it would be important to create transparent electronic materials that were stable, environmentally friendly, and able to be manufactured at reasonable costs. We wanted systems that would work, not just be laboratory curiosities.”

According to OSU researchers, some of the research that could bring transparent integrated circuits into applied use may be accomplished in a period of a few years, OSU researchers said, compared to decades in the evolution of conventional electronics. Licensing to HP of the exclusive rights to develop and market products based on this technology has also helped the inventions move ahead quickly. HP officials have said they envision applications in the display, printing, medical and automotive industries – not to mention solar energy.

New industries, employment opportunities, and more effective or less costly consumer products are all possible as the era of transparent electronics evolves, OSU researchers say.

OSU scientists also just published the first-ever book in this field, titled “Transparent Electronics,” through Springer Science and Business Media.

Source: Oregon State University

Explore further: Guided bullet demonstrates repeatable performance against moving targets

Related Stories

Groups want review of Shell's Arctic regulatory filings

7 minutes ago

Two groups petitioned the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday for an investigation of Royal Dutch Shell PLC and what the groups call misstatements in regulatory filings regarding the risk of a catastrophic oil ...

Apple's Mac is selling strong, iPad not so much

31 minutes ago

Apple's iPhone was again the company's star in the first three months of the year. The tech giant sold 61 million iPhones, or 40 percent more than in the same period a year ago. That represented about two-thirds ...

Claims about the decline of the West are 'exaggerated'

7 hours ago

A new paper by Oxford researchers argues that some countries in Western Europe, and the USA, Canada, Australia and New Zealand now have birth rates that are now relatively close to replacement, that the underlying trend in ...

Norway tests out 'animal rights cops'

8 hours ago

Norwegian police is creating a unit to investigate cruelty to animals, the government said Monday, arguing that those who hurt animals often harm people too.

Recommended for you

Making LED-illuminated advertisements light and flexible

Apr 27, 2015

VTT is involved in a European project, developing novel LED advertising displays, which combine thin, lightweight and bendable structures with advanced optical quality. The project will implement, for example, a LED display ...

Detecting human life with remote technology

Apr 27, 2015

Flinders engineering students Laith Al-Shimaysawee and Ali Al-Dabbagh have developed ground-breaking new technology for detecting human life using remote cameras.

Team develops faster, higher quality 3-D camera

Apr 24, 2015

When Microsoft released the Kinect for Xbox in November 2010, it transformed the video game industry. The most inexpensive 3-D camera to date, the Kinect bypassed the need for joysticks and controllers by ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

dfwrunner
not rated yet Jun 17, 2008
Once again, no technical content...what is the estimated efficiency?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.